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I'm looking to alternate row colors using PHP function. Here's what I have (although it does not work):

function row($year) {
    if($year%2) 
        $color == "#FFF";
    else
        $color == "#000";
}

for ($year=2013; $year<=2023; $year++) 
    {
    row($year);
    echo "<tr bgcolor='$color'><td>$year</td><td>$tdate</td></tr>";
    }

Basically, if a year is odd I would like the color of the row to be white. If even, black.

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4  
bgcolor ffs ! –  hsz Feb 1 '13 at 16:41
1  
Use CSS for this sort of thing. Defining zebra stripes in your PHP code is soooo 2003. –  SDC Feb 1 '13 at 16:45
    
Your $color variable is discarded after row returns; use a return value instead. And use a class name instead of bgcolor. @SDC: IE <= 8 doesn't support nth-child. –  Marcel Korpel Feb 1 '13 at 16:47
    
@MarcelKorpel - Use either ie9.js or Selectivzr to back-port nth-child to old IE. Or just let IE users go without the stripes -- it won't kill them not to have stripes. –  SDC Feb 1 '13 at 16:51

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From W3c

15.1.1 Background color - bgcolor attribute has been deprecated in favor of style sheets for specifying background color information.

now what should you do is

function row($year) {
    return ($year % 2 == 0) ? "#FFFFFF" : "#000000";
}

for ($year = 2013; $year <= 2023; $year++) {
    echo "<tr style='background-color:".row($year).";'><td>$year</td><td>$tdate</td></tr>";
}

however its looks like you are not aware of what == does its a equal to operator its not assignment operator

what assignment operator do is assign right hand side value to left hand for example

enter image description here

what Comparison Operators(==) do is

$a == $b    Equal   TRUE if $a is equal to $b after type juggling.

second you also there is the scope of a variable

The scope of a variable is the context within which it is defined. For the most part all PHP variables only have a single scope. This single scope spans included and required files as well.

above is quoted from php manual to read more check this

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Why don't you just use CSS with the nth-child selector?

tr:nth-child( 2n ) {
  background-color: #000;
}
tr:nth-child( 2n + 1 ) {
  background-color: #FFF;
}

Then no further attributes are needed on the <tr> element.

Besides the IE, most browsers support this. See the Browser compatibility of MDN.

share|improve this answer
    
This is best approach IMO. Keep the styling logic in CSS. –  Mike Brant Feb 1 '13 at 16:43
    
+1 Use CSS wherever you can, it removes (view related) complexity from your code and allows for more flexible styling. –  Halcyon Feb 1 '13 at 16:44
    
+1. Even IE can be made to support this using tools like Selectivizr. –  SDC Feb 1 '13 at 16:46
    
"Besides the IE" is an under-statement. Trying to make it work it work in IE(using various other hacks/plugs) will be an overkill for something as simple as this, imo. –  web-nomad Feb 1 '13 at 16:46
    
@Pushpesh - not true. Either ie9.js or Selectivzr makes it easy. Or just let IE users go without the stripes -- it won't kill them not to have stripes. –  SDC Feb 1 '13 at 16:48
for ($year=2013; $year<=2023; $year++) 
{
    echo "<tr bgcolor='".$year%2==0?"#fff":"#000"."'><td>$year</td><td>$tdate</td></tr>";
}
share|improve this answer
function row($year) {
    $color = '';
    if($year%2) 
        $color = "#FFF";
    else
        $color = "#000";

   return $color;
}

for ($year=2013; $year<=2023; $year++) 
    {
    $color = row($year);
    echo "<tr bgcolor='$color'><td>$year</td><td>$tdate</td></tr>";
    }
share|improve this answer
    
hmm that doesn't seem to work. –  Jeb Thomas Feb 1 '13 at 18:42
    
@JebThomas Please see the updated answer. Also, check if $tdate exists, else it will give a warning. You had used == in the function instead of =. –  web-nomad Feb 1 '13 at 18:49
    
Awesome - thanks!! –  Jeb Thomas Feb 1 '13 at 18:55
    
Please mark it as correct answer if it helped you. Thanks. –  web-nomad Feb 1 '13 at 19:14

You aren't saving the result of your function anywhere. Try this:

function row($year) {
    if($year%2) 
        $color == "#FFF";
    else
        $color == "#000";
}

for ($year=2013; $year<=2023; $year++) 
{
    $color = row($year);
    echo "<tr bgcolor='$color'><td>$year</td><td>$tdate</td></tr>";
}

It's about variable scope.

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you are not returning anything from function,do like this

function row($year) {
    if($year%2) 
        $color == "#FFF";
    else
        $color == "#000";
return $color;
}

for ($year=2013; $year<=2023; $year++) 
    {
    $color = row($year);
    echo "<tr bgcolor='$color'><td>$year</td><td>$tdate</td></tr>";
    }
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Just like other programming languages, you have to know when you're working with local variables and globals. In this case, you're trying to use a variable in one function that is local to another.

function row($year) {
    if($year%2 == 1) 
        return "#FFF";
    else
       return "#000";
}

for ($year=2013; $year<=2023; $year++) 
    {
    echo "<tr bgcolor='".row($year)."'><td>$year</td><td>$tdate</td></tr>";
    }
share|improve this answer

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