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I'm in the process of developing a C++ library providing different functions related to image/signal processing and other stuff. Its basically a development library for further use by developers. I want it to be as convenient and easy to use as possible. I have 3 different models in mind:

Model 1:

A single large namespace containing all the functionalities of the library. e.g The C++ Standard Library is implemented inside the namespace std. Or OpenCV is implemented inside the namespace cv.

namespace library
{
    //all classes, variables, functions, datatypes are present inside this namespace
}

Model 2:

A parent namespace, further subdivided into child namespaces according to functionality. e.g The .NET Framework's parent namespace System contains namespace Collections, namespace Windows etc...

namespace library
{
    //datatypes go here

    namespace group1
    {
       //functions related to group 1
    }

    namespace group2
    {
       //functions related to group 2
    }

    .
    .
    .
}

Model 3:

Almost same as model 2, but containing functions as static members of classes instead of namespaces.

namespace library
{
   //datatypes go here

   class group1
   {
     public:
        static function1();
        static function2();
   }

   class group2
   {
     public:
        static function1();
        static function2();
   }
}  

I need recommendation on which of these design model is best? Is there any other better approach? Currently I am comfortable with the second model.

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closed as not constructive by Bo Persson, user763305, Björn Kaiser, J.Kommer, sgar91 Feb 1 '13 at 19:03

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3  
use whatever makes sense in your code (look at boost for example, there is no one standard, each library uses nested namespaces as necessary...) one thing I would say though is, use a namespace rather than a class to group functions... –  Nim Feb 1 '13 at 16:47
    
I personally find the model 2 more intuitive, and lets me know faster where should I look if I need to find something in the API. –  jviotti Feb 1 '13 at 16:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If the functions can be used independently (it seems like it is, looking at your suggestions), and several functions can be grouped semantically, I'd absolutely choose the second option.


Option 1: to put everything in a single namespace would lead to adding too many different things, grouped into one single group.

Option 2: I find it a lot more intuitive than the others. As the library combines several totally different things, it seems like a good idea to group everything in groups and all of these groups to be a part of a big namespace with name - the name of the library.

Option 3: this options is almost the same as Option 2, but using class instead of namespace seems bad to me. The C++ standard gives you namespaces for this, use them.


But it really depends on the library, you're going to write. Honestly, choosing one of these options and later switching to another one will not be a big deal. So, you can start using one of these options and if the things get ugly and you see, that some of the other options will be a better choice - just do it.


Example: I have my own library, which implements wrappers for sockets, threads, IPC communication, etc. The structure I chose is exactly what you suggest in Option 2.

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1  
Thankyou for the answer... Option 2 It Is :). –  sgar91 Feb 1 '13 at 17:01

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