Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
What is the difference between a field and a property in C#?
Difference between Property and Field in C# .NET 3.5+

Some time ago I inherited a C# web app wherein most class members that could be fields are defined as properties in one of the following two manners:

private Guid id;
public Guid Id
{
  get { return id; }
  set { id = value; }
}

public int someValue{ get; set; }

Namely, the getters/setters don't do anything other than ferry a value to/from a private field. In these cases, is there an advantage [or justification] for building these members out as properties vs. fields? And vice versa?

Would I be violating any unspoken rules or best practices by changing them to fields? Is there a notable performance difference -- for instance, incrementing someValue for a list of N objects one way or the other? (My current understanding is that field access is necessarily less complex [and efficient].)

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Justin, Raphaël Althaus, Reed Copsey, Arran, Michael Liu Feb 1 '13 at 17:16

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
As there isnt really one answer to this, it shouldn't really be a question here. But the thought would be that if you ever needed to do validation of some sort, the property allows that easily in the getter and setter. Where a field does not have that flexability. –  jzworkman Feb 1 '13 at 17:15
    
There are a number of existing discussions on the merits of Properties vs Field - here is another one Properties vs. Fields: Need help grasping the uses of Properties over Fields –  Justin Feb 1 '13 at 17:15
    
OK. The comment from @Dustin Campbell on the selected answer here is the only relevant justification I've seen so far. –  svidgen Feb 1 '13 at 17:20

1 Answer 1

It's mainly an OOP (Object Oriented Programming) notions: Encapsulation You can view a brief description here;

WikiPedia entry on Encapsulation

One of the possible uses is for example when trying to assign a value, to call a function to validate this new value. For example:

private Guid id;
public Guid Id
    {
        get { return id; }
        set { 
                if(checkValue(value)==true{
                     id=value
                } 
            }
     }
share|improve this answer
    
Yep. I understand what encapsulation can be used for. The question is, in cases where the encapsulation isn't doing anything special, isn't it just unnecessarily overhead (and code)? –  svidgen Feb 1 '13 at 17:29
    
Encapsulation should only be used when you can predict that your class will be used/extended by other class and you need to protect your code . Normally this is about 80% of the times. –  Sorcerer86pt Feb 6 '13 at 15:52

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.