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I have a customer table:

id   name
1    customer1
2    customer2
3    customer3

and a transaction table:

id   customer   amount   type
1    1          10       type1
2    1          15       type1
3    1          15       type2
4    2          60       type2
5    3          23       type1

What I want my query to return is the following table

name        type1    type2
customer1   2        1
customer2   0        1
customer3   1        0

Which shows that customer1 has made two transactions of type1 and 1 transaction of type2 and so forth.

Is there a query which I can use to obtain this result or do I have to use procedural code.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could try

select c.id as customer_id
   , c.name as customer_name
   , sum(case when t.`type` = 'type1' then 1 else 0 end) as count_of_type1
   , sum(case when t.`type` = 'type2' then 1 else 0 end) as count_of_type2
from customer c
   left join `transaction` t
   on c.id = t.customer
group by c.id, c.name

This query needs to iterate only once over the join.

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1  
using IF(t.type = 'type1', 1, 0) is a bit more succinct, IMO, but +1 since this is the way to do it –  nickf Sep 23 '09 at 10:50
1  
oh actually, since "booleans" in MySQL are actually just 1 and 0, you don't even need the IF/CASE statement at all: SUM(t.type = 'type1') will do it. –  nickf Sep 23 '09 at 10:51
    
Yeah. But even after a few years of C experience, I feel a little bit uncomfortable when I see code like some_array[x == 1]... :-) But I agree on the IF thingy being a little bit less verbose –  Dirk Sep 23 '09 at 10:57
    
Wouldn't the 'case when' part only check one of the many columns in the transaction table for the customer –  andho Sep 23 '09 at 11:11
    
@andho: Sorry, I do not understand your question. Is there more than a single column in the transaction table, where a customer ID may be found? If so, there is nothing in your post which would suggest so. –  Dirk Sep 23 '09 at 11:20

dirk beat me to it ;)

Similar but will work in mysql 4.1 too.

Select c.name,
sum(if(type == 1,1,0)) as `type_1_total`,
sum(if(type == 2,1,0)) as `type_2_total`,
from 
customer c
join transaction t on (c.id = t.customer)
;
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SELECT  name, 
        (
        SELECT  COUNT(*)
        FROM    transaction t
        WHERE   t.customer = c.id
                AND t.type = 'type1'
        ) AS type1,
        (
        SELECT  COUNT(*)
        FROM    transaction t
        WHERE   t.customer = c.id
                AND t.type = 'type2'
        ) AS type2
FROM    customer c

To apply WHERE conditions to these columns use this:

SELECT  name
FROM    (
        SELECT  name, 
                (
                SELECT  COUNT(*)
                FROM    transaction t
                WHERE   t.customer = c.id
                        AND t.type = 'type1'
                ) AS type1,
                (
                SELECT  COUNT(*)
                FROM    transaction t
                WHERE   t.customer = c.id
                        AND t.type = 'type2'
                ) AS type2
        FROM    customer c
        ) q
WHERE   type1 > 3
share|improve this answer
    
Yes this is a good solution but is there a shorter query if there are many types? Because I am working on many types in a huge dataset –  andho Sep 23 '09 at 10:37
    
What you want is called pivoting. No, there is no simple way to do in in MySQL. Are you sure you need these type as columns, not rows? –  Quassnoi Sep 23 '09 at 10:44
    
Yeah having them as rows will make everything much easier but don't necessarily need them as such –  andho Sep 23 '09 at 11:06
    
It seems I am unable to use the new columns in a WHERE clause –  andho Sep 23 '09 at 11:11
1  
@andho: wrap the whole query into a subquery and select from it. –  Quassnoi Sep 23 '09 at 11:22

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