Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Can you print anything in C++, before entering into the main function?

Is there any possibility to run any other instructions before int main() is invoked?

int main(){cout<<"a";}

and before that call in main() there is call for cout<<"b"; somewhere before. Maybe this #define thing can help.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by chris, Shog9 Feb 1 '13 at 23:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
bool f() { cout << "before main"; return true; } bool dummy = f(); int main(){ cout<<"main"; } –  jrok Feb 1 '13 at 17:26
    
Of course there is, google it. –  Seth Carnegie Feb 1 '13 at 17:27
    
Yes. In fact, you can even exit the program before main :) –  chris Feb 1 '13 at 17:27
5  
I felt like I was following this right up until "this #define thing". then .. huh? –  WhozCraig Feb 1 '13 at 17:27
    
@WhozCraig LOL. –  Nik Bougalis Feb 1 '13 at 17:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You don't need a define. Just create a global object (in the same file) and its ctor (or anything else you use to initialize it, such as calling a function) will run before main is invoked.

Edit: likewise, those global objects will be destroyed after main exits, so their destructors will run at that time.

share|improve this answer
    
Work great. I will accept it as soon as I can. Is there any possibility to run something after main()? –  Yoda Feb 1 '13 at 17:32
1  
@RobertKilar, Destructors. –  chris Feb 1 '13 at 17:32

Global objects are constructed before main() runs. So you can define a class, put your code in its constructor, and then declare a global instance of that class:

class temp
{
public:
    temp()
    {
        cout << "before main" << endl;
    }

    ~temp()
    {
       cout << "after main" << endl;
    }
};

temp t;

int main()
{
    cout << "in main" << endl;
    return 0;
}

Global variables are also initialized before main() runs. You can define a function that returns a value, then call that function and assign the value to a global variable in its declaration, like @jrok showed.

Some compilers also support a #pragma startup statement to execute a user-defined function at startup (and corresponding #pragma exit statement for shutdown):

void beforeMain()
{
    cout << "before main" << endl;
}
#pragma startup beforeMain

void afterMain()
{
    cout << "after main" << endl;
}
#pragma exit afterMain

int main()
{
    cout << "in main" << endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just being global does not ensure the object is created/initialized before main executes. It has to be in the same translation unit as main to ensure it's created before main is invoked. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 1 '13 at 17:43

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.