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These are possible output formats for ps h -eo etime

21-18:26:30
   15:28:37
      48:14
      00:01

How to parse them into seconds?

  • Please assume at least 3 digits for the days part as I don't know how long it can be.
  • The output will be egreped to one only line so no need for a loop.
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This won't answer your question, but why not just use etimes instead? It gives you the same value, in seconds. –  Hasturkun Feb 4 '13 at 10:36
    
What is etimes? A program? A format option to ps? –  Clodoaldo Neto Feb 4 '13 at 10:49
    
A ps format option, identical to etime except output is in seconds instead of [[DD-]hh:]mm:ss –  Hasturkun Feb 4 '13 at 10:53
3  
@Hasturkun RedHat's version of ps does not have an etimes format specifier. ps h -eo etime,etimes ERROR: Unknown user-defined format specifier "etimes". –  Clodoaldo Neto Feb 4 '13 at 10:56
    
Same goes for CentOS (since it is derived from RHEL) –  rinogo Apr 23 at 21:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

With awk:

{
  if (NF == 2) {
    print $1*60 + $2
  } else if (NF == 3) {
    split($1, a, "-");
    if (a[2] > 0) {
      print ((a[1]*24+a[2])*60 + $2) * 60 + $3;
    } else {
      print ($1*60 + $2) * 60 + $3;
    }
  }
}

Run with :

awk -F $':' -f file.awk < datafile

Output:

1880790
55717
2894
1

Or if you want it in a bash script:

#!/bin/bash
echo $1 | awk -F $':' -f <(cat - <<-'EOF'
  {
    if (NF == 2) {
      print $1*60 + $2
    } else if (NF == 3) {
      split($1, a, "-");
      if (a[2] > 0) {
        print ((a[1]*24+a[2])*60 + $2) * 60 + $3;
      } else {
        print ($1*60 + $2) * 60 + $3;
      }
    }
  }
EOF
)

Output:

$ ./script.sh 21-18:26:30
1880790
$ ./script.sh 15:28:37
55717
$ ./script.sh 48:14
2894
$ ./script.sh 00:01
1

And finally, if you want to pipe to the parser, you can do something like this:

#!/bin/bash
awk -F $':' -f <(cat - <<-'EOF'
  {
    if (NF == 2) {
      print $1*60 + $2
    } else if (NF == 3) {
      split($1, a, "-");
      if (a[2] > 0) {
        print ((a[1]*24+a[2])*60 + $2) * 60 + $3;
      } else {
        print ($1*60 + $2) * 60 + $3;
      }
    }
  }
EOF
) < /dev/stdin

And run like this:

ps h -eo etime | ./script.sh 
share|improve this answer
    
Looks good. I will try to implement on monday. –  Clodoaldo Neto Feb 2 '13 at 1:19

Here's mine Perl one liner: ps -eo pid,comm,etime | perl -ane '@t=reverse split(/[:-]/,$F[2]); $s=$t[0]+$t[1]*60+$t[2]*3600+$t[3]*86400; print "$F[0]\t$F[1]\t$F[2]\t$s\n"'

Undefined values are rendering to zero, so they won't have effect on the sum of seconds.

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Here's a PHP alternative, readable and fully unit-tested:

//Convert the etime string $s (as returned by the `ps` command) into seconds
function parse_etime($s) {
    $m = array();
    preg_match("/^(([\d]+)-)?(([\d]+):)?([\d]+):([\d]+)$/", trim($s), $m); //Man page for `ps` says that the format for etime is [[dd-]hh:]mm:ss
    return
        $m[2]*86400+    //Days
        $m[4]*3600+     //Hours
        $m[5]*60+       //Minutes
        $m[6];          //Seconds
}
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Try to use my solution with sed+awk:

ps --pid $YOUR_PID -o etime= | sed 's/:\|-/ /g;' |\ 
awk '{print $4" "$3" "$2" "$1}' |\
awk '{print $1+$2*60+$3*3600+$4*86400}'

it splits the string with sed, then inverts the numbers backwards ("DD hh mm ss" -> "ss mm hh DD") and calculates them with awk.

$ echo 21-18:26:30 | sed 's/:\|-/ /g;' | awk '{print $4" "$3" "$2" "$1}' | awk '{print $1+$2*60+$3*3600+$4*86400}'
1880790
$ echo 15:28:37 | sed 's/:\|-/ /g;' | awk '{print $4" "$3" "$2" "$1}' | awk '{print $1+$2*60+$3*3600+$4*86400}'
55717
$ echo 48:14 | sed 's/:\|-/ /g;' | awk '{print $4" "$3" "$2" "$1}' | awk '{print $1+$2*60+$3*3600+$4*86400}'
2894
$ echo 00:01 | sed 's/:\|-/ /g;' | awk '{print $4" "$3" "$2" "$1}' | awk '{print $1+$2*60+$3*3600+$4*86400}'
1

Also you can play with sed and remove all non-numeric characters from input string:

sed 's/[^0-9]/ /g;' | awk '{print $4" "$3" "$2" "$1}' | awk '{print $1+$2*60+$3*3600+$4*86400}'
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#!/bin/bash
echo $1 | sed 's/-/:/g' |  awk -F $':' -f <(cat - <<-'EOF'
  {
    if (NF == 1) {
        print $1
    }
    if (NF == 2) {
        print $1*60 + $2
    }
    if (NF == 3) {
        print $1*60*60 + $2*60 + $3;
    }
    if (NF == 4) {
        print $1*24*60*60 + $2*60*60 + $3*60 + $4;
    }
    if (NF > 4 ) {
        print "Cannot convert datatime to seconds"
        exit 2
    }
  }
EOF
) < /dev/stdin

Then to run use:

ps -eo etime | ./script.sh 
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