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Question:

I want to port the below SQL code from (MS) SQL-Server to PostgreSQL.

DECLARE @iStartYear integer
DECLARE @iStartMonth integer


DECLARE @iEndYear integer
DECLARE @iEndMonth integer

SET @iStartYear = 2012
SET @iStartMonth = 4


SET @iEndYear = 2016
SET @iEndMonth = 1


;WITH CTE 
AS
(

        SELECT 
             --@iStartYear AS TheStartYear 
             @iStartMonth AS TheRunningMonth 
            ,@iStartYear AS TheYear  
            ,@iStartMonth AS TheMonth 

    UNION ALL 

        SELECT 
             --CTE.TheStartYear AS TheStartYear 
             --@iStartYear AS TheStartYear 
             CTE.TheRunningMonth + 1 AS TheRunningMonth 
            --,CTE.TheStartYear + (CTE.TheRunningMonth / 12) AS TheYear 
            ,@iStartYear + (CTE.TheRunningMonth / 12) AS TheYear 
            ,(CTE.TheMonth + 1 -1) % 12 + 1 AS TheMonth
        FROM CTE 
        WHERE (1=1) 

        AND
        (
            CASE 
                --WHEN (CTE.TheStartYear + (CTE.TheRunningMonth / 12) ) < @iEndYear 
                WHEN (@iStartYear + (CTE.TheRunningMonth / 12) ) < @iEndYear 
                    THEN 1 
                --WHEN (CTE.TheStartYear + (CTE.TheRunningMonth / 12) ) = @iEndYear 
                WHEN (@iStartYear + (CTE.TheRunningMonth / 12) ) = @iEndYear 
                    THEN 
                        CASE 
                            WHEN ( (CTE.TheMonth + 1 -1) % 12 + 1 ) <= @iEndMonth 
                                THEN 1 
                            ELSE 0 
                        END 
                ELSE 0 
            END = 1 
        )

)

SELECT * FROM CTE 

This is what I have so far.

DO $$
    DECLARE r record;
    DECLARE i integer;

    DECLARE __iStartYear integer;
    DECLARE __iStartMonth integer;


    DECLARE __iEndYear integer;
    DECLARE __iEndMonth integer;

    DECLARE __mytext character varying(200);
BEGIN
    i:= 5;

    --RAISE NOTICE  'test'
    --RAISE NOTICE  'test1' || 'test2';


    __mytext := 'Test message';
    --RAISE NOTICE __mytext;
    RAISE NOTICE '%', __mytext;
    RAISE NOTICE '% %', 'arg1', 'arg2';

    --SQL Standard:  "CAST( value AS text )" [or varchar]
    --PostgreSQL short-hand:  "value::text"
    __mytext := 'Test ' || i::text;
    RAISE NOTICE '%', __mytext;

    __mytext := 'mynumber: ' || CAST(i as varchar(33)) || '%';
    RAISE NOTICE '%', __mytext;

    __iStartYear := 2012;
    __iStartMonth := 4;

     __iEndYear := 2016;
     __iEndMonth := 1;

     --PERFORM  'abc';
     SELECT 'abc';

    -- SELECT  __iStartMonth AS TheRunningMonth; 


     --RAISE NOTICE  'The raise_test() function began.' + CAST( i AS text ) ;
    --FOR r IN SELECT table_schema, table_name FROM information_schema.tables WHERE table_type = 'VIEW' AND table_schema = 'public'
    --LOOP
      --  EXECUTE 'GRANT ALL ON ' || quote_ident(r.table_schema) || '.' || quote_ident(r.table_name) || ' TO webuser';
    --END LOOP;
END$$;

As you can see, I had a few problems when wanting to 'print' with the raise notice functionality.
But I managed to resolve that with google.

From previous experience, I can tell that the Postgres syntax with CTE's is so similar I only have to add a recursive before the CTE, so the only real problem is that I have to define some variables, for which I need a do block.

From this results the simple question that I have:
How can I "perform" a select query in a do block ?
I want to see the results in the 'data output' tab in pgAdmin3.
And I don't want to create a function.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

DO command vs. PL/pgSQL function

The DO command does not return rows. You can send NOTICES or RAISE other messages (with language plpgsql) or you can write to a (temporary) table and later SELECT from it to get around this.

But really, you should create a (plpgsql) function instead, where you can define a return type with the RETURNS clause or OUT / INOUT parameters and return from the function in various ways.

generate-series() for problem at hand:

For the problem at hand you don't seem to need any of this. Use this simple query instead:

SELECT row_number() OVER () AS running_month
      ,extract('year'  FROM m) AS theyear
      ,extract('month' FROM m) AS themonth
FROM  (
   SELECT generate_series('2012-04-01'::date
                         ,'2016-01-01'::date
                         ,interval '1 month') AS m
   ) AS g
share|improve this answer

Here more details on the workaround with the temp table that Erwin advised, which should be the real answer to the question, since the question is more geared towards "during development, how can I quickly write a code block with a select and see the results" than it is to solve this actual query (the underlying question from the beginning was "howto quickly developping/debugging table valued functions").

Although I must say I'd like to upvote the generate_series part 100 times ;)

It's possible to select the results into a temp table,
and select from the temp table outside the do block,
like this:

DO $$
    DECLARE r record;
    DECLARE i integer;

    DECLARE __iStartYear integer;
    DECLARE __iStartMonth integer;


    DECLARE __iEndYear integer;
    DECLARE __iEndMonth integer;

    DECLARE __mytext character varying(200);
BEGIN
    i:= 5;

    -- Using Raise:
    -- http://www.java2s.com/Code/PostgreSQL/Postgre-SQL/UsingRAISENOTICE.htm

    --RAISE NOTICE  'test'
    --RAISE NOTICE  'test1' || 'test2';


    __mytext := 'Test message';
    --RAISE NOTICE __mytext;
    RAISE NOTICE '%', __mytext;
    RAISE NOTICE '%', 'arg1' || 'arg2';
    RAISE NOTICE '% %', 'arg1', 'arg2';

    --SQL Standard:  "CAST( value AS text )" [or varchar]
    --PostgreSQL short-hand:  "value::text"
    __mytext := 'Test ' || i::text;
    RAISE NOTICE '%', __mytext;

    __mytext := 'mynumber: ' || CAST(i as varchar(33)) || '%';
    RAISE NOTICE '%', __mytext;

    __iStartYear := 2012;
    __iStartMonth := 4;

     __iEndYear := 2016;
     __iEndMonth := 1;

     --PERFORM  'abc';


     --CREATE TEMP TABLE mytable AS SELECT * FROM orig_table;

     --DROP TABLE table_name CASCADE;
     --DROP TABLE IF EXISTS table_name CASCADE;

     --DROP TABLE IF EXISTS tbl;
     --CREATE TEMP TABLE tbl AS SELECT 1 as a,2 as b,3 as c;

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS mytable;
CREATE TEMP TABLE mytable AS


WITH RECURSIVE CTE 
AS
(

        SELECT 
             --__iStartYear AS TheStartYear 
             __iStartMonth AS TheRunningMonth 
            ,__iStartYear AS TheYear  
            ,__iStartMonth AS TheMonth 

    UNION ALL 

        SELECT 
             --CTE.TheStartYear AS TheStartYear 
             --__iStartYear AS TheStartYear 
             CTE.TheRunningMonth + 1 AS TheRunningMonth 
            --,CTE.TheStartYear + (CTE.TheRunningMonth / 12) AS TheYear 
            ,__iStartYear + (CTE.TheRunningMonth / 12) AS TheYear 
            ,(CTE.TheMonth + 1 -1) % 12 + 1 AS TheMonth
        FROM CTE 
        WHERE (1=1) 

        AND
        (
            CASE 
                --WHEN (CTE.TheStartYear + (CTE.TheRunningMonth / 12) ) < __iEndYear 
                WHEN (__iStartYear + (CTE.TheRunningMonth / 12) ) < __iEndYear 
                    THEN 1 
                --WHEN (CTE.TheStartYear + (CTE.TheRunningMonth / 12) ) = __iEndYear 
                WHEN (__iStartYear + (CTE.TheRunningMonth / 12) ) = __iEndYear 
                    THEN 
                        CASE 
                            WHEN ( (CTE.TheMonth + 1 -1) % 12 + 1 ) <= __iEndMonth 
                                THEN 1 
                            ELSE 0 
                        END 
                ELSE 0 
            END = 1 
        )

)


SELECT * FROM CTE; 


    -- SELECT  __iStartMonth AS TheRunningMonth; 


     --RAISE NOTICE  'The raise_test() function began.' + CAST( i AS text ) ;
    --FOR r IN SELECT table_schema, table_name FROM information_schema.tables WHERE table_type = 'VIEW' AND table_schema = 'public'
    --LOOP
      --  EXECUTE 'GRANT ALL ON ' || quote_ident(r.table_schema) || '.' || quote_ident(r.table_name) || ' TO webuser';
    --END LOOP;
END$$;


SELECT * FROM mytable;

Which really is the base to quickly turn a query into a table-valued function version, which looks like this btw.:

-- SELECT * FROM tfu_V_RPT_MonthList(2012,1,2013,4);

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION tfu_V_RPT_MonthList
( 
     __iStartYear integer
    ,__iStartMonth integer
    ,__iEndYear integer
    ,__iEndMonth integer
)
  RETURNS TABLE(
     TheRunningMonth integer
    ,TheYear integer
    ,TheMonth integer
) AS
$BODY$
DECLARE
-- Declare vars here
BEGIN
RETURN QUERY 

WITH RECURSIVE CTE 
AS
(

        SELECT 
             --__iStartYear AS TheStartYear 
             __iStartMonth AS TheRunningMonth 
            ,__iStartYear AS TheYear  
            ,__iStartMonth AS TheMonth 

    UNION ALL 

        SELECT 
             --CTE.TheStartYear AS TheStartYear 
             --__iStartYear AS TheStartYear 
             CTE.TheRunningMonth + 1 AS TheRunningMonth 
            --,CTE.TheStartYear + (CTE.TheRunningMonth / 12) AS TheYear 
            ,__iStartYear + (CTE.TheRunningMonth / 12) AS TheYear 
            ,(CTE.TheMonth + 1 -1) % 12 + 1 AS TheMonth
        FROM CTE 
        WHERE (1=1) 

        AND
        (
            CASE 
                --WHEN (CTE.TheStartYear + (CTE.TheRunningMonth / 12) ) < __iEndYear 
                WHEN (__iStartYear + (CTE.TheRunningMonth / 12) ) < __iEndYear 
                    THEN 1 
                --WHEN (CTE.TheStartYear + (CTE.TheRunningMonth / 12) ) = __iEndYear 
                WHEN (__iStartYear + (CTE.TheRunningMonth / 12) ) = __iEndYear 
                    THEN 
                        CASE 
                            WHEN ( (CTE.TheMonth + 1 -1) % 12 + 1 ) <= __iEndMonth 
                                THEN 1 
                            ELSE 0 
                        END 
                ELSE 0 
            END = 1 
        )

)

    SELECT * FROM CTE ;

END;
$BODY$
  LANGUAGE plpgsql VOLATILE


--ALTER FUNCTION dbo.tfu_v_dms_desktop(character varying) OWNER TO postgres;





BTW, have a look at the SQL-Server codebloat to achive this:

SELECT 
     extract('year' FROM m) AS RPT_Year
    -- http://www.postgresql.org/docs/current/interactive/functions-formatting.html#FUNCTIONS-FORMATTING-DATETIME-TABLE
    --,to_char(m, 'TMmon')
    --,to_char(m, 'TMmonth')
    ,to_char(m, 'Month') AS RPT_MonthName 
    ,m AS RPT_MonthStartDate
    ,m + INTERVAL '1 month' - INTERVAL '1 day' AS RPT_MonthEndDate 

FROM 
(
   SELECT 
        generate_series((2012::text || '-' || 4::text || '-01')::date, (2016::text || '-' || 1::text || '-01')::date, interval '1 month') AS m 
) AS g
;

Turns into this:

DECLARE @in_iStartYear integer
DECLARE @in_iStartMonth integer


DECLARE @in_iEndYear integer
DECLARE @in_iEndMonth integer

SET @in_iStartYear = 2012
SET @in_iStartMonth = 12


SET @in_iEndYear = 2016
SET @in_iEndMonth = 12



DECLARE @strOriginalLanguage AS nvarchar(200) 
DECLARE @dtStartDate AS datetime 
DECLARE @dtEndDate AS datetime 


SET @strOriginalLanguage = (SELECT @@LANGUAGE) 

SET @dtStartDate = DATEADD(YEAR, @in_iStartYear - 1900, 0) 
SET @dtStartDate = DATEADD(MONTH, @in_iStartMonth -1, @dtStartDate) 

SET @dtEndDate = DATEADD(YEAR, @in_iEndYear - 1900, 0) 
SET @dtEndDate = DATEADD(MONTH, @in_iEndMonth -1, @dtEndDate) 

SET LANGUAGE 'us_english'


;WITH CTE_YearsMonthStartAndEnd 
AS
(
        SELECT
             YEAR(@dtStartDate) AS RPT_Year 
            ,DATENAME(MONTH, @dtStartDate) AS RPT_MonthName 
            ,@dtStartDate AS RPT_MonthStartDate  
            ,DATEADD(DAY, -1, DATEADD(MONTH, 1, @dtStartDate)) AS RPT_MonthEndDate 

    UNION ALL

        SELECT 
             YEAR(DATEADD(MONTH, 1, CTE_YearsMonthStartAndEnd.RPT_MonthStartDate)) AS RPT_Year 
            ,DATENAME(MONTH, DATEADD(MONTH, 1, CTE_YearsMonthStartAndEnd.RPT_MonthStartDate)) AS RPT_MonthName 
            ,DATEADD(MONTH, 1, CTE_YearsMonthStartAndEnd.RPT_MonthStartDate) AS RPT_MonthStartDate 
            ,DATEADD(DAY, -1, DATEADD(MONTH, 1, DATEADD(MONTH, 1, CTE_YearsMonthStartAndEnd.RPT_MonthStartDate)) ) AS RPT_MonthEndDate 

        FROM CTE_YearsMonthStartAndEnd 
        WHERE DATEADD(MONTH, 1, CTE_YearsMonthStartAndEnd.RPT_MonthStartDate) <= @dtEndDate 
)

SELECT 
     RPT_Year 
    ,RPT_MonthName 
    ,RPT_MonthStartDate 
    ,RPT_MonthEndDate 
FROM CTE_YearsMonthStartAndEnd 

(thanks Erwin !) ;)

share|improve this answer
    
The side-to-side comparison to SQL-Server is insightful. Thanks for sharing! –  Erwin Brandstetter Feb 2 '13 at 21:29

This is a not too off-topic (IMHO), and may be helpful ...

I ran into this issue recently where I needed to execute a number of statements in a transaction and return some (very little) data which would indicate to a PHP script how the transaction was processed (records affected and any custom error code).

Sticking to the RAISE NOTICE and RAISE [EXCEPTION] paradigm, I found it best to return a JSON string in the NOTICE/EXCEPTION being returned. This way, all the PHP app would need to do is use pg_last_notice() or pg_last_error() to get and decode the JSON string.

e.g.

RAISE EXCEPTION '{"std_response":{"affected":%,"error":%}}', var_affected, var_error_id;

or

RAISE NOTICE '{"std_response":{"affected":%,"error":%}}', var_affected, var_error_id;

Since the returning JSON object named "std_response" is actually a standard response for all these types of scripts, it makes it really easy to write unit tests since the wrapper function that loads and executes the SQL will always return a "std_response" object that can have it's values tested.

This paradigm should only be be used if you return TINY pieces of data in the RAISE message (although I have seen up to 96,000 characters returned this way - not sure what the limit is). If you need to return a larger set of data, you will need to save the result-set into a table but at least you can still use this paradigm to isolate exactly which records belong the called SQL. i.e. place the data into a table with a UUID and return the UUID in the NOTICE like so:

RAISE NOTICE '{"table_name":{"affected":%,"uuid":%}}', var_affected, var_uuid;

The nice thing about this is that since it's still structured and describes which table to select the data from, it can also be used with unit tests in the app.

(Alternatively, you can also use Postgresql to store the result-set in memcache and have the application pickup the dataset from there, that way you don't have to deal with the disk I/O just for storing the result-set the app will use to generate some HTML then immediately throw away when the script finishes)

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Interesting. Might be improved with built-in JSON functions in PostgreSQL 9.2 to simplify building the NOTICE text. –  Erwin Brandstetter Mar 27 '13 at 3:08
    
I can't seen to find any documentation on the limit of the text that can be placed in the NOTICE / ERROR message –  Michael.M Apr 1 '13 at 19:01

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