Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a problem with this little code for educational purposes. I can not understand how it works.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

#define FNAME "info.txt"
#define STDIN 0
int main(){

   int fd;
   fd = open(FNAME, O_RDONLY);

   close(STDIN); //entry 0 on FDT is now free
   dup(fd); //fd duplicate is now stored at entry 0 
   execlp("more","more",0); 
}

By starting this program it prints the contents of the file "info.txt" on terminal. I can not understand why! Where is the link between "more" and STDIN (keyboard or file)?

Why if i use more with no args and without redirection on file it just shows a help screen but whit redirection it uses the file as input?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

dup always gives you the lowest available file descriptor number.

By default all process will have 0, 1 and 2 for stdin, stdout and stderr. You are opening a file from that you will get a file descriptor value 3. After that you have closed stdin. Now calling dup after that will give you a lowest available value as a duplicate file descriptor for 3, so you will be getting stdin as duplicate file descriptor for 3.

int main()
{
   int fd, fd2;
   fd = open(FNAME, O_RDONLY); //This will be 3

   fd2 = dup(fd); //This will be 4 because 4 is the lowest available value
   close(STDIN); //entry 0 on FDT is now free
   dup(fd); //fd duplicate is now stored at entry 0 
   execlp("more","more",0); 
}

And here why its displaying the content of the file is, more command can be used in two ways.

  • more filename
  • command | more

In your exec, you are not giving any filename as command line argument for more command. So its executing in pipe mode, by reading it from stdin.

share|improve this answer
    
I know that. I can not understand why more uses the STDIN as input instead of show only the help screen –  Fabio Carello Feb 1 '13 at 18:27
    
It checks whether the input is a terminal, and shows help screen if it is. Otherwise it reads stdin, to allow some commands | more usage which is fairly common. –  Anton Kovalenko Feb 1 '13 at 18:31
    
The "more" command checks if the input is a terminal, and if so says "Sorry, you haven't given me any input". If it's not a terminal [such as in this case, a file], then it goes on and prints the content. –  Mats Petersson Feb 1 '13 at 19:08
    
@FabioCarello updated my answer –  raja ashok Feb 1 '13 at 19:24
    
Ok.I t's the same of more info.txt | more Thanks raja! –  Fabio Carello Feb 2 '13 at 10:24
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.