Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have a c code like below.
i want to count number of words in a text delimited with a delimiter.
the code compiles but stops.
what is the problem.
this is my code below.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int WordCount(char *text,char delimiter)
{
    char *s;
    int count = 0;
    strcpy(s,text);
    while(*s){
        if(*s==delimiter){
            count++;
        }
    }
    return count;
}

int main(void)
{
    char *line = "a,b,c,d,e";

    printf("%d\n",WordCount(line,','));
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
You arent incrementing your pointer s to actually MOVE through the string either. Im pretty sure that your WordCount routine might be an infinite loop situation. –  trumpetlicks Feb 1 '13 at 19:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You forgot to increment the pointer s, thus you had an infinite loop, and instead of copying the string (for which you would need to allocate memory), just let it point to the input.

int WordCount(char *text,char delimiter)
{
    char *s = text;
    int count = 0;
    // strcpy(s,text);
    while(*s){
        if(*s==delimiter){
            count++;
        }
        ++s;
    }
    return count;
}
share|improve this answer
char *s;
int count = 0;
strcpy(s,text);

s is an uninitialized pointer not an array object.

share|improve this answer

char *s; - allocate memory for s in stack or heap.

Mistakes in your program

  • All variable must be initalized while declaring.
  • Valid Memory should be allocated/assigned to a pointer variable.
  • Indefinite Loop, its checking always the first character of the string.

Modify your code like below

...
char *s = NULL;
int count = 0;
s = text; 
while(*s);
{
    if (*s == delimiter)
    {
        count++;
    }
    s++;
}
...
share|improve this answer
1  
He doenst need to make a copy, thus why allocate? –  trumpetlicks Feb 1 '13 at 19:30
    
updated my answer –  raja ashok Feb 1 '13 at 20:53
    
So now you are always updating s with s++, and if s[count] == the delimeter, you essentially are double counting, because you increment count also then referencing using s[count] –  trumpetlicks Feb 1 '13 at 21:05
    
typo mistake... –  raja ashok Feb 1 '13 at 21:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.