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See the following:

$('body').on('whyhellothere', function(){

    console.log('done...');                                     

});

$('body').triggerHandler('whyhellothere');

This snippet returns:

done...

While if we reverse the order:

$('body').triggerHandler('whyhellothere');

$('body').on('whyhellothere', function(){

    console.log('done...');                                     

});

This snippet returns nothing. Why is this the case?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you shout in the forest, and then I come along, I won't hear anything, would I?

You're registering the event handler after the event was triggered. A registered handler can only listen to events that are triggered after they start listening.

It's simple physics :P

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Great analogy :) I have to refactor my code slightly now which would make it less intelligible than if order was maintained. Thanks again, i get it now. –  Bilbo Baggins Feb 1 '13 at 19:44
    
@BilboBaggins - You should've asked Gandalf though. I'm sure he could make me hear what you shouted before I arrived... –  Joseph Silber Feb 1 '13 at 19:48
    
He's always so busy, he doesn't have time for me :) –  Bilbo Baggins Feb 1 '13 at 19:54

Javascript gets processed top down. It doesn't recognize your on call as some top-level definition that should be processed before something else. So you're calling one function that triggers a handler, that function call looks for all currently registered handlers for that event, of which there are none, and then calls them all (of which there are none). Then you add a new handler to that event listener. And any calls thereafter will iterate the list of handlers (now 1) and call them.

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That makes a lot of sense. Cheers! –  Bilbo Baggins Feb 1 '13 at 19:45

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