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I've been struggling to write a code for extracting every N columns from an input file and write them into output files according to their extracting order.

(My real world case is to extract every 800 columns from a total 24005 columns file starting at column 6, so I need a loop)

In a simpler case below, extracting every 3 columns(fields) from an input file with a start point of the 2nd column.

for example, if the input file looks like:

aa 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
bb 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
cc 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
dd 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

and I want the output to look like this: output_file_1:

1 2 3
1 2 3
1 2 3
1 2 3

output_file_2:

4 5 6  
4 5 6 
4 5 6 
4 5 6 

output_file_3:

7 8 9
7 8 9 
7 8 9
7 8 9

I tried this, but it doesn't work:

awk 'for(i=2;i<=10;i+a) {{printf "%s ",$i};a=3}' <inputfile>

It gave me syntax error and the more I fix the more problems coming out.

I also tried the linux command cut but while I was dealing with large files this seems effortless. And I wonder if cut would do a loop cut of every 3 fields just like the awk.

Can someone please help me with this and give a quick explanation? Thanks in advance.

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4 Answers 4

awk '{ print $2, $3,  $4 >"output_file_1";
       print $5, $6,  $7 >"output_file_2";
       print $8, $9, $10 >"output_file_3";
     }' input_file

This makes one pass through the input file, which is preferable to multiple passes. Clearly, the code shown only deals with the fixed number of columns (and therefore a fixed number of output files). It can be modified, if necessary, to deal with variable numbers of columns and generating variable file names, etc.


(My real world case is to extract every 800 columns from a total 24005 columns file starting at column 6, so I need a loop)

In that case, you're correct; you need a loop. In fact, you need two loops:

awk 'BEGIN { gap = 800; start = 6; filebase = "output_file_"; }
     {
         for (i = start; i < start + gap; i++)
         {
             file = sprintf("%s%d", filebase, i);
             for (j = i; j <= NF; j += gap)
                  printf("%s ", $j) > file;
             printf "\n" > file;
         }
     }' input_file

I demonstrated this to my satisfaction with an input file with 25 columns (numbers 1-25 in the corresponding columns) and gap set to 8 and start set to 2. The output below is the resulting 8 files pasted horizontally.

2 10 18    3 11 19    4 12 20    5 13 21    6 14 22    7 15 23    8 16 24    9 17 25
2 10 18    3 11 19    4 12 20    5 13 21    6 14 22    7 15 23    8 16 24    9 17 25
2 10 18    3 11 19    4 12 20    5 13 21    6 14 22    7 15 23    8 16 24    9 17 25
2 10 18    3 11 19    4 12 20    5 13 21    6 14 22    7 15 23    8 16 24    9 17 25
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Thanks for the tip! :) –  hek2mgl Feb 1 '13 at 20:17
    
Will learn to write more than one liners with awk! thanks again! –  hek2mgl Feb 1 '13 at 22:17
3  
One thing to watch - with 800 files, you may run into issues with the number of file descriptors your process can have open simultaneously. There's a chance awk will handle it if it can't have 800+ files open; there's a chance it won't. If it does handle it, then each line of output to each file will involve closing and opening a file, which is expensive. So it is probably worth doing some timing tests on the real data (in terms of line width) but at small scale (in terms of numbers of lines of data). Look at the output from truss or strace or dtrace or equivalent. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 2 '13 at 0:17

Actions to be performed by awk on the input data must be included in curled braces, so the reason the awk one-liner you tried results in a syntax error is that the for cycle does not respect this rule. A syntactically correct version will be:

awk '{for(i=2;i<=10;i+a) {printf "%s ",$i};a=3}' <inputfile>

This is syntactically correct (almost, see end of this post.), but does not do what you think.

To separate the output by columns on different files, the best thing is to use awk redirection operator >. This will give you the desired output, given that your input files always has 10 columns:

awk '{ print $2,$3,$4 > "file_1"; print $5,$6,$7 > "file_2"; print $8,$9,$10 > "file_3"}' <inputfile>

mind the " " to specify the filenames.


EDITED: REAL WORLD CASE

If you have to loop along the columns because you have too many of them, you can still use awk (gawk), with two loops: one on the output files and one on the columns per file. This is a possible way:

#!/usr/bin/gawk -f 

BEGIN{
  CTOT = 24005 # total number of columns, you can use NF as well
  DELTA = 800  # columns per file
  START = 6 # first useful column
  d = CTOT/DELTA # number of output files.
}
{
  for ( i = 0 ; i < d ; i++)
  {
    for ( j = 0 ; j < DELTA ; j++)
    {
      printf("%f\t",$(START+j+i*DELTA)) > "file_out_"i
    }
    printf("\n") >  "file_out_"i
   }
 }

I have tried this on the simple input files in your example. It works if CTOT can be divided by DELTA. I assumed you had floats (%f) just change that with what you need.

Let me know.


P.s. going back to your original one-liner, note that the loop is an infinite one, as i is not incremented: i+a must be substituted by i+=a, and a=3 must be inside the inner braces:

awk '{for(i=2;i<=10;i+=a) {printf "%s ",$i;a=3}}' <inputfile>

this evaluates a=3 at every cycle, which is a bit pointless. A better version would thus be:

awk '{for(i=2;i<=10;i+=3) {printf "%s ",$i}}' <inputfile>

Still, this will just print the 2nd, 5th and 8th column of your file, which is not what you wanted.

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I was successful using the following command line. :) It uses a for loop and pipes the awk program into it's stdin using -f -. The awk program itself is created using bash variable math.

for i in 0 1 2; do 
    echo "{print \$$((i*3+2)) \" \" \$$((i*3+3)) \" \" \$$((i*3+4))}" \
  | awk -f -  t.file   > "file$((i+1))"
done

Update: After the question has updated I tried to hack a script that creates the requested 800-cols-awk script dynamically ( a version according to Jonathan Lefflers answer) and pipe that to awk. Although the scripts looks good (for me ) it produces an awk syntax error. The question is, is this too much for awk or am I missing something? Would really appreciate feedback!

Update: Investigated this and found documentation that says awk has a lot af restrictions. They told to use gawk in this situations. (GNU's awk implementation). I've done that. But still I'll get an syntax error. Still feedback appreciated!

#!/bin/bash

# Note! Although the script's output looks ok (for me)
# it produces an awk syntax error. is this just too much for awk?

# open pipe to stdin of awk
exec 3> >(gawk -f - test.file)

# verify output using cat
#exec 3> >(cat)

echo '{' >&3

# write dynamic script to awk
for i in {0..24005..800} ; do
    echo -n " print " >&3
    for (( j=$i; j <= $((i+800)); j++ )) ; do
        echo -n "\$$j " >&3
        if [ $j = 24005 ] ; then
            break
        fi
    done
    echo "> \"file$((i/800+1))\";" >&3
done
echo "}"
share|improve this answer
    
I like your method, but the thing is that in the real world, my question is more like to get every 800 columns in a total 24000 columns file. To my understanding the first line of the script "for i in 0 1 2; do " is to define the number of columns to be extracted(am I correct here?) , so putting three numbers is fine, but is there a simpler way that I can to instead of putting all 800 numbers here? thanks –  user1687130 Feb 1 '13 at 20:31
    
sorry the initial question is not clear, I'm changing that. –  user1687130 Feb 1 '13 at 20:34
    
still struggeling ;) –  hek2mgl Feb 1 '13 at 20:59

With GNU awk:

$ awk -v d=3 '{for(i=2;i<NF;i+=d) print gensub("(([^ ]+ +){" i-1 "})(([^ ]+( +|$)){" d "}).*","\\3",""); print "----"}' file
1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
----
1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
----
1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
----
1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
----

Just redirect the output to files if desired:

$ awk -v d=3 '{sfx=0; for(i=2;i<NF;i+=d) print gensub("(([^ ]+ +){" i-1 "})(([^ ]+( +|$)){" d "}).*","\\3","") > "output_file_" ++sfx}' file

The idea is just to tell gensub() to skip the first few (i-1) fields then print the number of fields you want (d = 3) and ignore the rest (.*). If you're not printing exact multiples of the number of fields you'll need to massage how many fields get printed on the last loop iteration. Do the math...

Here's a version that'd work in any awk. It requires 2 loops and modifies the spaces between fields but it's probably easier to understand:

$ awk -v d=3 '{sfx=0; for(i=2;i<=NF;i+=d) {str=fs=""; for(j=i;j<i+d;j++) {str = str fs $j; fs=" "}; print str > "output_file_" ++sfx} }' file
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