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I'm trying to use sed to remove blocks of html code from a file. The block to be remove appears multiple times in the file and also spans multiple lines. Also of notes the block has different content in it but has clear start and end delineations.

I have tried a number of approaches to get this to work and am running into issues getting laziness working in sed and matching across lines.

Here is an example of what I'm trying to do:

good stuff a
good stuff same line START
bad stuff 1.0
bad stuff 1.1
END
good stuff b
good stuff b
good stuff same line START bad stuff 2.0
bad stuff 2.0
END
good stuff c

Becomes:

good stuff a
good stuff same line
good stuff b
good stuff b
good stuff same line
good stuff c

Here are some approaches I have tried so far.

sed -n '1h;1!H;${;g;s/START.*END//mg;p;}' < test > test2 Gets across lines to work.

sed -n 's/START[^END]*END//g' < test > test2 Only negates E or N or D.

sed -n 's/START.*?END//g' < test > test2 Doesn't behave with laziness.

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
What's "laziness"? – Ed Morton Feb 2 '13 at 14:48
up vote 1 down vote accepted

One sed might be to hard to do that. Two seds make it trivial:

sed 's/START/\nSTART\n/g' | sed '/START/,/END/d'

share|improve this answer
    
this doesn't seem to add newlines in my terminal – Alex Unger Feb 1 '13 at 22:24
    
It works for me exactly as you requested in your question. Goal is not to add newlines, but to move START to a separate line which will be then removed by range delete. – aragaer Feb 1 '13 at 22:25
    
works on my linux machine but not on mac. thank you! – Alex Unger Feb 1 '13 at 22:32
    
The portable way to get sed to understand newlines is to hard-code them as a backslash followed by carriage return. – Ed Morton Feb 2 '13 at 14:51
    
That doesn't work on Linux. – aragaer Feb 2 '13 at 17:31

sed is not great for dealing with multi-line input. Use awk instead.
You want to match a line for it's regular expression, and turn off printing if it's the beginning of your 'bad' block. Here's an example for your file:

$ awk '
BEGIN    { pr = 1; }
/^START/  { pr = 0; }
          { if (pr) print; }
/^END/    { pr = 1; }
' < yourfile
good stuff a
good stuff b
good stuff b
good stuff c
share|improve this answer
    
This chews up the whole line and thus doesn't meet the requirements of the question. – Josh Oct 10 '13 at 11:08

How about:

$ sed '/START/,/END/d' file.txt
good stuff a
good stuff b
good stuff b
good stuff c

Read more about ranges here

share|improve this answer
    
won't work since START could be on same line as good stuff – aragaer Feb 1 '13 at 21:38
    
True, but then again, you shouldn't parse html with sed... – Fredrik Pihl Feb 1 '13 at 22:09

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed '/START/!b;:a;/END/bb;$!{N;ba};:b;s/START.*END//' file
share|improve this answer
    
Deals well with placement of START and END within a line, and multiple occurances. – Josh Oct 10 '13 at 11:24

sed is an excellent tool for simple substitutions on a single line, for anything else use awk:

$ awk 'sub(/START.*|.*END/,""){f=!f;if(NF)print;next} !f' file
good stuff a
good stuff same line
good stuff b
good stuff b
good stuff same line
good stuff c
share|improve this answer
    
Solves this particular problem, but doesn't use sed and doesn't work for certain edge cases (see potong's solution). – Josh Oct 10 '13 at 11:25
    
Clearly it doesn't use sed as this is not an appropriate job for sed. Which edge cases are you referring to? – Ed Morton Oct 10 '13 at 12:41

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