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In my DB are hundreds of thousands of rows. I'm trying to calculate the RSI for stocks or forex.

The formula for RSI(14) is:

100 - (100 / 1 + RS )

RS is the Average Gain / Average Loss.

The formula looks back for the past 14 rows (including current row) and averages the values for the rows where there was a gain (or up move) and divides that average by the average of rows where there was a loss.

The issue I'm having in MySQL is getting it to select the average gain and average loss for the prior 14 rows. This is easy to do in Excel. In Excel I create a column that analyzes whether there was a Gain or Loss and then I use AVERAGEIF(Range,Criteria,Average_Range). No problem at all. But Excel won't work with the massive number of rows I have to analyze.

I've thought about something like this:

SELECT *, 
       id, 
       (SELECT 10000 * Avg(close - open) 
        FROM   `2011` 
        WHERE  id <= 25 
               AND id >= ( 25 - 13 ) 
               AND ( close - open ) >= 0) / (SELECT 10000 * Avg(open - close) 
                                             FROM   `2011` 
                                             WHERE  id <= 25 
                                                    AND id >= ( 25 - 13 ) 
                                                    AND ( open - close ) > 0) 
FROM   `2011` 
LIMIT  50 

The limit 50 is just to keep in manageable. But this doesn't do what I want it to do. It does the math part just right, but it repeats the same number for every row.

So when it is on row 25, it looks at rows 12 through 25. Then for row 26, it looks at rows 13 through 26, etc, which will be a new number for each row. Instead, the SELECT statement above repeats the same number in the last column, which should be different for each row because it has a different range than everything else.

share|improve this question
    
$sql = "SELECT date,time,round(100-(100/(1+(if(theFirst.id > 13,(SELECT AVG(close - open) FROM `2011` "; $sql = "SELECT date,time,round(100-(100/(1+(if(theFirst.id > 13,(SELECT AVG(close - open) FROM `2011` "; $sql .="WHERE open < close AND id >= (theFirst.id - 13) AND id <= theFirst.id LIMIT 1),'') / "; $sql .="if(theFirst.id > 13,(SELECT AVG(open - close) FROM `2011` "; $sql .="WHERE open > close AND id >= (theFirst.id - 13) AND id <= theFirst.id LIMIT 1),'')))),2) "; $sql .="FROM `2011` theFirst "; $sql .="LIMIT 25"; – j_allen_morris Feb 1 '13 at 20:18
    
This took 26.2669439316 seconds with the LIMIT 25. – j_allen_morris Feb 1 '13 at 20:18
    
Build a materialised view of the 14-day moving average, that will allow you to work with the data without incurring the huge overhead of calculating it each time. – jgm Feb 1 '13 at 20:20
    
Can you provide a dump of the table so we can run your query?...I think probably you are missing a GROUP BY clause ..by id for example – sandino Feb 1 '13 at 20:21
    
I don't have a 14 day moving average. This uses the Close price to calculate RSI. – j_allen_morris Feb 1 '13 at 20:24

The following is a simpler way of expressing the query:

select t.*,
        100 - (100 / (1 + avg(case when close - open > 0 then close - open end)/avg(case when open - close > 0 then open - close end))
              ) as RS14
 from `2011` t join
      `2011` t2
      on t2.id between t.id - 14 and t
group by t.id

I cannot swear that it will go faster, but it might. You should also have an index on id.

If you really need functionality like this, can you switch databases? SQL Server 2012, Oracle, and Postgres all offer cumulative sum functionality that would work for this type of query.

I've been thinking about this problem, and you can do the query efficiently. Perhaps the more painful way is with explicit joins:

select
from `2011` t0 join
     `2011` t1
     on t0.id = t1.id + 1 join
     `2011` t2
     on t0.id = t1.id + 2 join
     . . .
     2011` t13
     on t0.id = t13.id + 13

You need to work out the expression that you want, using the 14 variables from the different tables. However, this will efficiently use an index on id and should be fast (probably faster to run than to write).

The other method starts with the observation that you can get every 14th value pretty easily:

select ((t.id-1) div 14)*14,
       100 - (100 / (1 + avg(case when close - open > 0 then close - open end)/avg(case when open - close > 0 then open - close end))           
from `2011` t
group by ((t.id-1) div 14)

The expressions may not be exactly right. The idea is to use aggregation to group rows of 14 together.

Now, we can get the intermediate rows by doing:

select (((t.id-1 + offset) div 14))*14+offset,
       100 - (100 / (1 + avg(case when close - open > 0 then close - open end)/avg(case when open - close > 0 then open - close end))           
from `2011` t cross join
     (select 0 as offset union all select 1 union all . . .
      select 13
     ) offsets
group by (((t.id-1 + offset) div 14))*14+offset

This does a cross join to get the rows in-between.

Either of these last two should perform quite well. I would go for the group by solution, because it is easier to write, maintain, and modify.

share|improve this answer
    
This is my reseller hosting servers that I don't have access to different programs. Short of using one of my spare computers as a server for just this function, I can't switch databases. – j_allen_morris Feb 1 '13 at 21:55

The problem is that MySQL doesn't automatically do what spreadsheets do, which is to adjust the subquery depending on the id in the outer query.

You need a correlated subquery, something like this:

SELECT A.*, A.id,
        (SELECT 10000 * AVG(B.close - B.open)
         FROM `2011` B
         WHERE B.id <= A.id
               AND B.id >= ( A.id - 13 )
               AND (B.close - B.open) >= 0 / (SELECT 10000 * AVG(C.open - C.close)
                                              FROM `2011` C
                                              WHERE C.id <= A.id
                                                    AND C.id >= (A.id - 13)
                                                    AND (C.open - C.close) > 0)
 FROM `2011` A
 LIMIT 50
share|improve this answer
    
I have it correlating the subquery but it takes forever. After I posted initially, I found prior code of mine that works, but it's super slow. I may try the materialized view suggested above. – j_allen_morris Feb 1 '13 at 20:26
    
@j_allen_morris . . . Instead of materializing the view, add a counter that you can use as the row number. – Gordon Linoff Feb 1 '13 at 20:49
    
@GordonLinoff, why not use the id that already is there? – j_allen_morris Feb 1 '13 at 20:50

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