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Is there a way to detect at compile-time if a class has a vtable or not? I am trying to ensure a class is aligned to 64-byte boundaries and is 64 bytes in length. Adding a vtable increases the class size to 128 bytes.

class __attribute__((aligned(64))) C
{
private:
    int64_t iValue;
    char iPadding[64 - sizeof(int64_t)];
};

This is fine. However

class __attribute__((aligned(64))) C
{
public:
    virtual ~C() {}

private:
    int64_t iValue;
    char iPadding[64 - sizeof(int64_t)];
};

screws things up.

Answer: aligned also pads, not just controls location. __declspec(align()) seems to do the same!

Edit: Still bamboozled. After putting a check in the constructor of C that checks that this is divisible by 64 and throw an exception if it's not, I'm getting exceptions. Initially I though it might have to do with having instances of C on the stack, but after changing them to being heap-based the alignment check is still failing. I'll just fall back to a factory function that calls posix_memalign and do in-place new (which is probably what std::aligned_storage eventually does)

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What is the purpose of iPadding[] ? Just to pad out your class so if you have an array of them, their iValue member will always be on a 64-byte boundary? –  phonetagger Feb 1 '13 at 21:26
    
With C++11, you could also use std::aligned_storage to align your class. –  ipc Feb 1 '13 at 21:30
    
@James: alignment can add padding because that's how the compiler can assure that elements of an array are aligned. –  Michael Burr Feb 1 '13 at 22:11
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Instead of adding padding bytes manually, why not just use __attribute__((aligned(64))) and let the compiler align it for you whether or not there's a vtable present? Then you'll always get 64 byte alignment with no other work needed, and it removes the dependency on knowing the size of the vtable.

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seems he's already doing that –  thang Feb 1 '13 at 21:05
    
I don't want any other variable on the same cache line as iValue. iPadding is never used. the presence of a vtable may throw a spanner in the works. Not sure yet. –  James Feb 1 '13 at 21:05
1  
why do you need it to be 64 bytes? all you really need is 64-byte alignment, right? –  thang Feb 1 '13 at 21:09
2  
@James, then it looks like 64-byte alignment will do, right? you think if the class takes 32-bytes, then the compiler will try to squeeze some other data in to the second 32-byte block? wouldn't that violate the 64-byte boundary? –  thang Feb 1 '13 at 21:16
1  
@James - If you delete the unused manual padding, the compiler will insert unused automatic padding for you. Just delete the padding line: see how it works. –  Robᵩ Feb 1 '13 at 21:39
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Yes you can; use std::is_polymorphic.

If you're trying to align something though, use std::aligned_storage with placement new:

std::aligned_storage<sizeof(C), 64> as;
C* c = new (&as) C;

// use c...

c->~C(); // call destructor ourselves
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That's why I like C++11 :) –  buc Feb 1 '13 at 21:00
    
Note that this may or may not have any effect on being able to solve the actual problem (alignment). –  Mark B Feb 1 '13 at 21:01
    
This works at compile-time? Can I ask you for an example? I tried char iPadding[64 - (sizeof(int64_t) + std::is_polymorphic<C>::value ? 8 : 0]; and gcc doesn't like it... "incomplete type 'class C'" –  James Feb 1 '13 at 21:07
1  
@James yes, C must be defined, not just declared. –  Seth Carnegie Feb 1 '13 at 21:25
    
@James if you're looking to align something though, I'd recommend std::aligned_storage since it's portable. –  Seth Carnegie Feb 1 '13 at 21:58
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Stop trying to manually add padding bytes. Just define the variable you want to be aligned with the aligned attribute, like this:

class C
{
public:
    virtual ~C() {}

//private:
    __attribute__((aligned(64))) int64_t iValue;
};

void printAddr(C* a, int i)
{
    printf("&a[%d] = %p   &a[%d].iValue = %p\n", i, &a[i], i, &a[i].iValue);
}

int main()
{
    C a[8];
    printf("\nsizof(C) is: %d\n\n", sizeof(C));
    for (int i=0; i<sizeof(a)/sizeof(a[0]); ++i)
        printAddr(a, i);

    printf("\n");
}

If your class has a vtable, that will of course enlarge the size of the class, but the compiler will insert the necessary padding for you, and also adjust the alignment requirement of the encompassing class as necessary to ensure that the member with the strictest (largest) alignment will be properly aligned. BTW, the vtable is not stored in an object, only a vtable pointer. So if you're on a 32-bit system, the vtable pointer takes up only 4 bytes. The rest of the sizeof(C)=128 that you were seeing was padding that the compiler added to ensure that an array of objects of type C would be aligned, but it was shifting the variable that you care about out of alignment: assuming you actually need iValue aligned on a 64-byte boundary, it's no longer aligned on such a boundary.


OR.... If you don't actually have to have iValue itself aligned on a 64-byte boundary, and you just need your class aligned on a 64-byte boundary but you don't want to unnecessarily add bulk to the class, the answer is simpler:

STOP ADDING YOUR OWN PADDING BYTES! Just do this:

class __attribute__((aligned(64))) C
{
public:
    virtual ~C() {}

//private:
    int64_t iValue;
};

void printAddr(C* a, int i)
{
    printf("&a[%d] = %p   &a[%d].iValue = %p\n", i, &a[i], i, &a[i].iValue);
}

int main()
{
    C a[8];
    printf("\nsizof(C) is: %d\n\n", sizeof(C));
    for (int i=0; i<sizeof(a)/sizeof(a[0]); ++i)
        printAddr(a, i);

    printf("\n");
}

Note that if you do it this way, the iValue member is no longer aligned on 64-byte boundaries, but they are all 64-bytes away from their neighbor's iValue.

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