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Given data that looks similar to this:

+---------+-----------+----------+
| country | city      | district |
+---------+-----------+----------+
| Japan   | Tokyo     | 1        |
| Japan   | Tokyo     | 1        |
| Japan   | Tokyo     | 2        |
| China   | Shanghai  | A        |
| China   | Shanghai  | A        |
| China   | Shanghai  | A        |
| China   | Beijing   | X        |
| China   | Beijing   | Y        |
| China   | Beijing   | Z        |
| India   | Mumbai    | 123      |
| India   | Mumbai    | 123      |
| India   | Mumbai    | 123      |
| India   | New Delhi | 321      |
| India   | New Delhi | 321      |
| India   | New Delhi | 321      |
+---------+-----------+----------+

I know I can get the data visually by first doing:

SELECT * from that_table
GROUP BY country, city, district

and I'd get:

+---------+-----------+----------+
| country | city      | district |
+---------+-----------+----------+
| Japan   | Tokyo     | 1        |
| Japan   | Tokyo     | 2        |
| China   | Shanghai  | A        |
| China   | Beijing   | X        |
| China   | Beijing   | Y        |
| China   | Beijing   | Z        |
| India   | Mumbai    | 123      |
| India   | New Delhi | 321      |
+---------+-----------+----------+

where I can see that only Japan/Tokyo and China/Beijing have multiple values for District. However, I have a huge source of data and I'd like to do that in SQL.

How do I form the SQL query to get all Country/City combinations with multiple Districts?

The output I'd like to achieve is:

+---------+-----------+----------+
| country | city      | district |
+---------+-----------+----------+
| Japan   | Tokyo     | 1        |
| Japan   | Tokyo     | 2        |
| China   | Beijing   | X        |
| China   | Beijing   | Y        |
| China   | Beijing   | Z        |
+---------+-----------+----------+
share|improve this question
    
Why does the source data have so many duplicate records in it? Saying something three times (such as <India, New Delhi, 321>) doesn't make it any more true. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 23 '09 at 12:20
    
In your case select * is very bad, especially with a group by. I rarely use select *, I only use it to query for tables for information, never in real code. –  Martin Sep 23 '09 at 12:52
    
I have no control over the source data. The data comes from the database of an old application which I only have read-only access to. –  Nikki Erwin Ramirez Sep 25 '09 at 10:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
SELECT a.*
FROM foo a
  JOIN (
    SELECT country, city
    FROM (SELECT distinct country, city, district FROM foo)
    GROUP BY country, city
    HAVING count(country) > 1) b
  ON a.city = b.city AND a.country = b.country
GROUP BY a.country, a.city, a.district

Result:

COUNTRY CITY	DISTRICT
Japan   Tokyo	2
Japan   Tokyo	1
China   Beijing	Z
China   Beijing	Y
China   Beijing	X
share|improve this answer
    
After verifying each of the suggested answers, only this answer provided me with the correct output. Thanks! :) –  Nikki Erwin Ramirez Sep 25 '09 at 10:43
SELECT DISTINCT country, city, district FROM that_table tt1
              JOIN (
                    SELECT country, city  from that_table
                    GROUP BY country, city
                    HAVING count(1) > 1) tt2
              ON tt1.city = tt2.city
              AND tt1.Country = tt2.country
share|improve this answer

You could add a condition that there must be at least one district for the same city with a different name:

SELECT a.*
FROM YourTable a
WHERE EXISTS (
    SELECT *
    FROM YourTable b
    WHERE a.Country = b.Country
    AND a.City = b.City
    AND a.District <> b.District
)
share|improve this answer

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