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I have a CSV file on my server, if a user clicks on a link it should download, but instead it opens up in my browser window.

My code looks as follows

<a href="files/csv/example/example.csv">
    Click here to download an example of the "CSV" file
</a>

It's a web server normal webserver where I have all of my dev work on.

I tried someting like

<a href="files/csv/example/csv.php">
    Click here to download an example of the "CSV" file
</a>

Now the contents of my csv.php file:

header('Content-Type: application/csv');
header('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename=example.csv');
header('Pragma: no-cache');

Now my issue is it's downloading but not my CSV file it's creating a new file.

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1  
What server do you use? –  Gumbo Sep 23 '09 at 12:10
2  
And how does any of this relate to PHP? –  pavium Sep 23 '09 at 12:14
    
You forget to output the file’s contents. –  Gumbo Sep 23 '09 at 12:42
    
updated my answer below with a solution to your new issue –  seengee Sep 23 '09 at 12:43
    
is this possible without using php? –  Jai Hind Rubik's Apr 24 at 9:46

8 Answers 8

up vote 50 down vote accepted

to brute force all csv's on your server to download you could add this to your .htaccess file:

AddType application/octet-stream csv

EDIT (an inline solution within your php file would be more like this):

header('Content-Type: application/csv');
header('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename=example.csv');
header('Pragma: no-cache');
readfile("/path/to/yourfile.csv");
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2  
Better use readfile instead of echo file_get_contents. –  Gumbo Sep 23 '09 at 14:06
    
yep my bad, readfile is less intensive in this context –  seengee Sep 23 '09 at 14:50
    
Why not just change the Content-Type line to Content-Type: application/octet-stream ? It seems a bit redundant to do it in an .htaccess when you're overriding it anyway. –  Powerlord Oct 22 '09 at 21:07
    
that was the inital answer to the question, the question then changed so the second part was the answer to that. –  seengee Oct 28 '09 at 8:34
    
This doesn't work in all browsers, with all filetypes. For example, it won't work on the latest (Aug 2013) version of Chrome with PDF files and perhaps csv files too. See my answer for how to get this working in a more reliable way. –  Chris Harrison Aug 5 '13 at 14:09

This cannot be done reliably, since it's up to the browser to decide what to do with an URL it's been asked to retrieve.

You can suggest to the browser that it should offer to "save to disk" right away by sending a Content-disposition header:

header("Content-disposition: attachment");

I'm not sure how well this is supported by various browsers. The alternative is to send a Content-type of application/octet-stream, but that is a hack (you're basically telling the browser "I'm not telling you what kind of file this is" and depending on the fact that most browsers will then offer a download dialog) and allegedly causes problems with Internet Explorer.

Read more about this in the Web Authoring FAQ.

Edit You've already switched to a PHP file to deliver the data - which is necessary to set the Content-disposition header (unless there are some arcane Apache settings that can also do this). Now all that's left to do is for that PHP file to read the contents of the CSV file and print them - the filename=example.csv in the header only suggests to the client browser what name to use for the file, it does not actually fetch the data from the file on the server.

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2  
Using "Content-disposition: attachment" has worked consistently for us in all FF versions, IE6 and IE7. –  Steve Claridge Sep 23 '09 at 12:31

Configure your server to send the file with the media type application/octet-stream.

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Or you can do this using html5. Simply with

<a href="example.csv" download>download not open it</a>
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Here is a more browser-safe solution:

    $fp = @fopen($yourfile, 'rb');

    if (strstr($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'], "MSIE"))
{
	header('Content-Type: "application/octet-stream"');
	header('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="yourname.file"');
	header('Expires: 0');
	header('Cache-Control: must-revalidate, post-check=0, pre-check=0');
	header("Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary");
	header('Pragma: public');
	header("Content-Length: ".filesize($yourfile));
}
else
{
	header('Content-Type: "application/octet-stream"');
	header('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="yourname.file"');
	header("Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary");
	header('Expires: 0');
	header('Pragma: no-cache');
	header("Content-Length: ".filesize($yourfile));
}

fpassthru($fp);
fclose($fp);
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Nice clean Solution.

<?php
    header('Content-Type: application/download');
    header('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="example.csv"');
    header("Content-Length: " . filesize("example.csv"));

    $fp = fopen("example.csv", "r");
    fpassthru($fp);
    fclose($fp);
?>
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This means, that your browser can handle this file type.

If you don't like it, the easiest method would be offering zip files. Everyone can handle zip files and they are downloadable by default.

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A previous answer on this page describes how to use .htaccess to force all files of a certain type to download. However, the solution does not work with all file types across all browsers. This is a more reliable way:

<FilesMatch "\.(?i:csv)$">
  ForceType application/octet-stream
  Header set Content-Disposition attachment
</FilesMatch>

You might need to flush your browser cache to see this working correctly.

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