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I'm trying to create a List<T> where the user specifies what the data type is by selecting it from a ComboBox on the UI. I've managed to create an object of the CustomEntity, which holds the List<T>, but once I exit from the Button1_Click event handler, the CustomEntity will go out of scope. Is it possible to create a class level variable? I tried but had to comment it out as it caused an error.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace CustomClassWithGenericList
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        //The following error is created: Cannot implicitly convert type
        //CustomClassWithGenericList.CustomEntity<decimal> to
        //CustomClassWithGenericList.CustomEntity<object>


        //private CustomEntity<object> input1;

        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            if (cb1.SelectedItem.ToString().ToUpper() == "DECIMAL")
            {
                input1 = new CustomEntity<decimal>();

                string[] temp = textBox1.Text.Split(',');

                foreach (string s in temp)
                {
                    decimal number;

                    if (decimal.TryParse(s, out number))
                    {
                        input1.inputValue.Add(number);
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        MessageBox.Show("Error occured.");
                    }
                }
            }
            else if(cb1.SelectedItem.ToString().ToUpper() == "INT")
            {
            }
            else if(cb1.SelectedItem.ToString().ToUpper() == "TIMESPAN")
            {
            }
        }
    }

    public class CustomEntity<T>
    {
        public List<T> inputValue; 

        public CustomEntity()
        {
            inputValue = new List<T>();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
CustomEntity<T> won't work as the compiler has no idea what T is at that particular point. CustomEntity<decimal> should work. –  J. Steen Feb 1 '13 at 22:19
    
@J.Steen: I don't think you're right about that. You can have a private List<T> variable, instantiate it with a specified T type at run time, and it works perfectly fine. –  Robert Harvey Feb 1 '13 at 22:20
    
It won't be visible throughout the program (only within a Form1 instantiation), but it should still work. –  Robert Harvey Feb 1 '13 at 22:22
1  
a suggestion would be to use a list that utilizes the object class CustomEntity<object> –  Sorceri Feb 1 '13 at 22:25
    
@RobertHarvey I'm actually pretty sure that particular declaration would receive a "The type or namespace name 'T' could not be found" error. –  J. Steen Feb 1 '13 at 22:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are plenty of techniques could be used there. First of all you could create Object or dynamic type variable and just casting it any you want.

Also you could store your data in some state in memory (like some session or application state, or cache, stuff like that) and in such case just take it from this source.

share|improve this answer
    
How does declaring a private member not qualify as in memory state? –  J. Steen Feb 1 '13 at 22:24
    
I mean some source like session state, cache and other places which available through all aplication. –  Ph0en1x Feb 1 '13 at 22:25
    
@Ph0en1x give me a few mins to check out the link u posted. Thanks! –  Hans Rudel Feb 1 '13 at 22:28
    
@Ph0en1x My mistake. But you should clarify that in your answer. =) –  J. Steen Feb 1 '13 at 22:30
    
@Ph0en1x 2 secs and ill update the code with object. I still get the following error: "Cannot implicitly convert type 'CustomClassWithGenericList.CustomEntity<decimal> ' to '......CustomEntity<object>'". –  Hans Rudel Feb 1 '13 at 22:35

The commented out line uses type T, which is not a defined type. Not that you need to specify the type argument list of the generic at the point of decleration, and not anywhere else.

If you want the generic to be able to hold any object, you should simple pass the type "object" as the type argument into it.

If it can only a few different types though, creating one member variable per type might be a prefered option, depending on how you plan to use it later.

share|improve this answer
    
no the whole point is that i wont know the type until the button has been clicked. Yet how can i have a class level variable to hold the custom class? Thanks for your time. –  Hans Rudel Feb 1 '13 at 22:27
    
+1 for your comment about storing them as objects. –  Hans Rudel Feb 1 '13 at 23:09

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