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I am trying to parse input from a file to represent a standard deck of cards (i.e. 2C represents the two of clubs). However, my solution is not working as expected, and is declaring all inputs to be invalid. I can't see any logical errors in my code, so I wanted to get a second opinion. The code is below:

/*
 * Determines if the input string is valid.
 * 
 * A string is considered valid if it begins with either a number (2-10) 
 * or a letter (J/j, Q/q, K/k) to deetermine rank, followed by a letter to
 * determine suit (C/c, D/d, H/h, S/s).
 */
bool inputValidator(string cardData)
{
    if (cardData.length() == 2) //Input string is two characters long
    {
        if (cardData[0] < '2' || cardData[0] > '9'
            || cardData[0] != 'J' || cardData[0] != 'j'
            || cardData[0] != 'Q' || cardData[0] != 'q'
            || cardData[0] != 'K' || cardData[0] != 'k'
            || cardData[0] != 'A' || cardData[0] != 'a')
        {
            cout << "Card with data " << cardData << " has an invalid rank." << endl;
            return false;
        }
        if (cardData[1] != 'C' || cardData[1] != 'c' //Parse suit
            || cardData[1] != 'D' || cardData[1] != 'd'
            || cardData[1] != 'H' || cardData[1] != 'h'
            || cardData[1] != 'S' || cardData[1] != 's')
        {
            cout << "Card with data " << cardData << " has an invalid suit." << endl;
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
    else if (cardData.length() == 3) //Input string is three characters long
        //This occurs only if the number is 10.
    {
        if (cardData[0] != '1' || cardData[1] != '0') //Parse rank
        {
            cout << "Card with data " << cardData << " has an invalid rank." << endl;
            return false;
        }
        if (cardData[2] != 'C' || cardData[2] != 'c' //Parse suit
            || cardData[2] != 'D' || cardData[2] != 'd'
            || cardData[2] != 'H' || cardData[2] != 'h'
            || cardData[2] != 'S' || cardData[2] != 's')
        {
            cout << "Card with data " << cardData << " has an invalid suit." << endl;
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

If there are any logical flaws (or an inherently better way to do this), I would appreciate being told. Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
What output do you get from what input, and what did you expect? –  Andy Prowl Feb 1 '13 at 22:26
    
What did you use as an input? –  Rapptz Feb 1 '13 at 22:26
    
The contents of the input file: 2C 3C 4C 5C 6C 7C 8C 9C 10C JC QC KC AC aD kD qD jD 10D 9D 8D 7D 6D 5D 4D 3D 2D 2h 3h 4h 5h 6h 7h 8h 9h 10h Jh Qh Kh Ah as ks qs js 10s 9s 8s 7s 6s 5s 4s 3s 2s –  bionicOnion Feb 1 '13 at 22:29
    
This input functions totally correctly in the rest of the program (if i skip the validation step; however, I would like to be able to ensure the safety of inputs. –  bionicOnion Feb 1 '13 at 22:30
    
It might be easier for you to store the valid possibilities in a string and search it for the character you're parsing. –  chris Feb 1 '13 at 22:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're writing clauses like this:

cardData[2] != 'D' || cardData[2] != 'd'

Which will always be true, as the variable being tested can't be both values at the same time. You probably meant to use && rather than ||.

You could certainly simplify the logic, for example by converting the input to lower or upper case before comparing it.

share|improve this answer

The problem seems to be in the way you combine your conditions. If I understand your expectation correctly, what you want for the first conditions is this:

    if (!(cardData[0] > '2' && cardData[0] < '9')
        && cardData[0] != 'J' && cardData[0] != 'j'
        && cardData[0] != 'Q' && cardData[0] != 'q'
        && cardData[0] != 'K' && cardData[0] != 'k'
        && cardData[0] != 'A' && cardData[0] != 'a')

And what you want for the second condition is this:

    if (cardData[1] != 'C' && cardData[1] != 'c' //Parse suit
        && cardData[1] != 'D' && cardData[1] != 'd'
        && cardData[1] != 'H' && cardData[1] != 'h'
        && cardData[1] != 'S' && cardData[1] != 's')
share|improve this answer

You can simplify the conditions a bit: And your conditions must be changed to do what you want.

bool inputValidator(string cardData)
{
    if (cardData.length() == 2) //Input string is two characters long

   {
        if (!((cardData[0] >= '2' && cardData[0] <= '9')
            || (cardData[0]|32) == 'j'
            || (cardData[0]|32) == 'q'
            || (cardData[0]|32) == 'k'
            || (cardData[0]|32) == 'a'))
        {
           cout << "Card with data " << cardData << " has an invalid rank." << endl;
           return false;
         }

        if (!((cardData[1]|32) == 'c' //Parse suit
            || (cardData[1]|32) == 'd'
            || (cardData[1]|32) == 'h'
            || (cardData[1]|32) == 's'))
        {
            cout << "Card with data " << cardData << " has an invalid suit." << endl;
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
    else if (cardData.length() == 3) //Input string is three characters long
        //This occurs only if the number is 10.
    {
        if (!(cardData[0] == '1' || cardData[1] == '0')) //Parse rank
        {
            cout << "Card with data " << cardData << " has an invalid rank." << endl;
            return false;
        }
        if (!((cardData[2]|32) == 'C' //Parse suit
            || (cardData[2]|32)  == 'd'
            || (cardData[2]|32)  == 'h'
            || (cardData[2]|32)  == 's'))
        {
            cout << "Card with data " << cardData << " has an invalid suit." << endl;
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

The code duplication for the second / third character should also be refactored.

share|improve this answer

Your logic expression isn't correct, also you are duplicating code, try to simply them to functions.

bool inputValidator(string cardData)
{
    if (cardData.length() == 2 && IsValidCard(cardData[0])) //Input string is two characters long
    {
        return IsValidSuite(cardData[1]);
    }
    else if(cardData.length() == 3) 
    {
        if (isValidRank(cardData[0]))
        {
            return IsValidSuite(cardData[2]);
        }
    }
    return false;
}

bool isValidRank(char c)
{
    if (c =='0' || c=='1')[
    {
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

bool IsValidCard(char c)
{
  if (c > '2' && c < '9')
  {
    return true;
  }

  switch(c)
  {
    case 'J':
    case 'j':
    case 'Q':
    case 'q':
    case 'K':
    case 'k':
    case 'A':
    case 'a':
      return true;
  }

  return false;
}    

bool IsValidSuite(char c)
{
  switch(c)
  {
    case 'C':
    case 'c':
    case 'D':
    case 'd':
    case 'H':
    case 'h':
    case 'S':
    case 's':
      return true;
  }
  return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
When length == 3, how does ValidRank not get fooled by "11S"? Or by any garbage in [1]? –  Gary Feb 2 '13 at 13:23

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