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I have an assignment that asks to do a number of functions only using these operators:

! ~ & ^ | + << >>

In some of the problems it is useful to make some integer, x, become all 1s if it contains any 1s but stay 0 if it is 0. The reason I do this is so I can return y or z like this:

// One of the two conditional values is now 0
int conditionalA = mask&y;
int conditionalB = ~mask&z;

// One of the values is combined with 0 using |
int out = conditionalA|conditionalB;

return out;

where I made mask like this:

// Make any x other than 0 all 1s
int mask = x;
mask |= mask>>1;
mask |= mask>>2;
mask |= mask>>4;
mask |= mask>>8;
mask |= mask>>16;

mask |= mask<<1;
mask |= mask<<2;
mask |= mask<<4;
mask |= mask<<8;
mask |= mask<<16;

There must be a better way to make mask all 1s or 0s but I can't think of a more efficient solution. Again, it is important that 0 remains 0 if x was 0.

Edit: If statements are not an option

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I guess you can't use literal constants? –  Jack Feb 1 '13 at 22:43
    
I could, but with further restrictions (only allowed to write numbers between 0x0 - 0xff and shift if they need to be bigger). I don't see how they would help though –  asimes Feb 1 '13 at 22:45
1  
Take a peek at this collection of bit-twiddling hacks: graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html –  vonbrand Feb 2 '13 at 1:54
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Assuming 2's complement:

int mask = !x + ~0;

The ! maps any nonzero value to 0 and 0 to 1, then we add ~0 (-1) to get -1 and 0 respectively.

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This is perfect, thank you –  asimes Feb 1 '13 at 22:50
    
Ah, it was good before as int mask = !x+~0;, I can't use - –  asimes Feb 1 '13 at 22:51
    
@asimes yes, I should have left it alone! Fixed, thanks. –  ecatmur Feb 1 '13 at 22:53
    
I'm not so sure about this answer. What integer is ~0? (Does the standard even specify?) Given that integer overflow is undefined, why do you think that 1 + ~0 == 0? –  Joshua Green Feb 2 '13 at 3:22
    
I guess this works if ~0 == -1, but I don't think that's guaranteed. –  Joshua Green Feb 2 '13 at 3:29
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How about:

x = (x | -x) >> 31; // Note this is implementation specific.

Ok, I'm using - which isn't allowed, so it's not the right answer here. I'll leave it here as a novelty.

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Doesn't work, right? If x started as 4, it ends as 0xfffffffc. –  Carl Norum Feb 1 '13 at 22:46
    
@JerryCoffin: It would. That's why he used -, not ~. –  David Schwartz Feb 1 '13 at 22:46
    
@JerryCoffin Wouldn't that be 0 | -0 which is 0 | 0? –  user529758 Feb 1 '13 at 22:46
    
Ah, I misread. Thanks for the correction. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 1 '13 at 22:47
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How did this get 3 upvotes when it doesn't give right answers even not considering the disallowed -? It gives incorrect results any time x starts as a power of two. –  Carl Norum Feb 1 '13 at 22:54
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Here's a working one I think (assumes two's complement arithmetic):

x = ~!!x + 1;

How did I get there?

First, !!x turns any non-zero vale into 1, and 0 stays 0. Then, using 2's complement equivalency for negation -x = ~x + 1, presto!

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Clever, but another part of the assignment is trying to make a habit of using minimal amounts of operators, so I'm going to stick with mask = !x+~0;. Thank you though –  asimes Feb 1 '13 at 22:55
    
If you want fewer operators, why not mask = !x + 0xffffffff? Edit: sorry - didn't see your extra restriction in the comment above. –  Carl Norum Feb 1 '13 at 22:56
    
Another arbitrary rule is not being able to write literals higher than 0xff, otherwise that would be even better –  asimes Feb 1 '13 at 22:57
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