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Is there any way to tell std::time_get get_date what century it is? We deal with dates before 1900. Is there a better C++ date time library that would allow this? We have an in-house solution that deals with a few cultures, but get_date seems to handle all cultures so it is good as a last resort catch all...

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Also, it's std::get_time not std::time_get or std::get_date. –  Rapptz Feb 1 '13 at 22:58
1  
@Rapptz OP probably refers to the facet function std::time_get<T>::get_date(), not to the I/O manipulator std::get_time() –  Cubbi Feb 1 '13 at 23:01
    
@Cubbi Ah. I actually couldn't find that one at all when I tried searching but now I see it. –  Rapptz Feb 1 '13 at 23:01
    
@Cubbi that's right –  PsychoDad Feb 1 '13 at 23:06
    
Negative time values? Seriously, the positive number indicates time after the Epoch. Search SO for "negative time_t'. –  Thomas Matthews Feb 1 '13 at 23:46
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you have a C++11 environment (at least in the std::lib implementation) you can make use of the new std::get_time manipulator:

template <class charT>
unspecified
get_time(struct tm* tmb, const charT* fmt);

For example:

#include <iomanip>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <ctime>

int
main()
{
    std::istringstream infile("1799-03-03");
    std::tm tm = {0};
    infile >> std::get_time(&tm, "%Y-%m-%d");
    std::cout << tm.tm_year + 1900 << '\n';
}

This should output:

1799

The %Y conversion specifier is specified as "the year as a decimal number (e.g., 1997)." When stored in a std::tm it will be the number of years past 1900, but the value is held by an int, accepting negatives.

The full set of conversion specifiers is specified by C++11 to be the set valid for the ISO/IEC 9945 function strptime.

If you're looking for a full-featured date library, boost::datetime that Rapptz mentioned is a good suggestion.

You are also welcome to use my personal date library which is a single header and single source that was proposed to the C++ committee and rejected. I mention that as the source is still in namespace std::chrono (for proposal purposes), but if you use it, you should change the namespace. Here's the proposal which documents the library, and links to the single header and source implementation.

Translating the above example would look like:

#include "date"
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

int
main()
{
    std::istringstream infile("1799-03-03");
    std::chrono::date date;
    infile >> date;
    std::cout << date.year() << '\n';
}

which again outputs:

1799

As implemented this library also depends on the C++11 std::get_time manipulator for input, and includes options for varying the I/O conversion specifier (specified in the linked proposal).

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You can try looking at Boost.Gregorian

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