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I'm writing mergesort in Scheme and I'm curious as to why this won't work...

Here is the implementation I expect to work, but doesn't:

(define (mergesort op l)
  (cond ((null? l) l)
      ((null? (cdr l)) l)
      (else (merge op (car l)
                      (mergesort op (cdr l))))
  )
)

And here is the 'proper' implementation.

(define (mergesort op l)
  (cond ((null? l) l)
      ((null? (cdr l)) l)
      (else (merge op (cons (car l) (list))
                      (mergesort op (cdr l))))
  )
)

Why must I (cons (car l) (list)) before trying to merge it with the recursion?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Notice that this:

(cons (car l) (list))

... Is equivalent to this:

(list (car l))

In other words, you must pass a list with a single element and not just an element as the second parameter for the merge procedure.

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1  
Many thanks Oscar! I can't believe I didn't notice that sooner– especially since I wrote the merge function myself. –  Clever Feb 1 '13 at 23:02

Oscar is exactly correct, but there's one thing about this that has been overlooked.

This isn't mergesort. What's the definition of mergesort? It takes the list, splits it in half, sorts each sorted list, then merges them together.

You're not splitting in half; you're splitting into one and the rest. Then you sort the rest, and merge the single element into the list. But you can think of merging a single element into a list as inserting the element into a list.

Aha, there's a clue! You've written insertion sort. Which is fine; it works. It's just much less efficient.

So the difference between mergesort and insertion sort is picking the wrong place to split your list.

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You're right! +1 –  Óscar López Feb 1 '13 at 23:47
    
Ah, good point. Mergesort seems much more difficult to write now that I think about it. –  Clever Feb 2 '13 at 18:24
    
It's not that bad; just take it in steps. First, you need to get the first half of the list, and sort it. Then, get the second half of the list, and sort it. Then merge those together. You've already done most of the work. –  zck Feb 2 '13 at 19:00
    
there's also a bottom-up merge sort: sort pairs of singleton lists (convert each elt into a singleton first), then pairs of {sorted 2-length lists}, then pairs of {sorted 4-length lists}, etc until there is only one merged list - the result. This is easy (-er?) to implement with a non-recursive code which might be an advantage. :) –  Will Ness Feb 3 '13 at 19:34

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