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I have two separate pieces of code for which I need to calculate the Big O complexity. The first one is:

k:=1;
s := 4;
while k < N do
begin
    k := 2 * k;
    m:=1;
    while m < N do
    begin
       for i := m to 2*m-1 do s := s + 2;
       m := m + m;
    end;
end;

The correct answer is N*log(N). The second piece of code is:

m:=1;
FOR i:=n downto 1 do
BEGIN
  m:=m*2;
  y:=i MOD 2;
  x:=m;
  WHILE x>y DO
  BEGIN
     x:=x DIV 2;
     y:=y*2
 END    
END

The correct answer for the second one is n*n. I can't seem to get my math right. If you could help with either one, it would be great help.

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What have you tried? –  Femaref Feb 1 '13 at 23:21

1 Answer 1

Let's take a look at this first piece of code:

k := 1;
s := 4;
while k < N do
begin
    k := 2 * k;
    m := 1;
    while m < N do
    begin
       for i := m to 2*m-1 do s := s + 2;
       m := m + m;
    end;
end;

One thing to notice is that the inner and outer loops are completely independent of one another, so we can analyze them separately. Let's begin with the inner loop.

As this loop runs, the values that m takes on will be 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, etc. because on each iteration m is doubling. Inside the loop, there's a third, smaller loop that runs a total of m times. This means that if the outer loop runs k times, the total runtime of the loop will be given by

1 + 2 + 4 + 8 + ... + 2k

One thing to note is that the inner loop terminates as soon as mN. Since on iteration k the value of m is 2k, the loop stops running as soon as 2kN. This happens as soon as k is at least log2 N. Therefore, the loop runs at most log2 N times, so the total work done here is

1 + 2 + 4 + 8 + ... + 2lg N = 2lg N + 1 - 1 = 2N - 1

Here, I'm using the formula for the sum of a geometric series to simplify the sum. This means that each iteration of the body of the loop does Θ(N) work.

All that remains to do now is figure out how many times the outer loop is going to run. Notice that, like the inner loop, the outer loop is controlled by a variable that doubles on each iteration (namely, k). Using similar logic, we get that this loop will run Θ(log N) times, and so the total runtime will be Θ(N log N).

Some takeaways:

Useful Tip #1: A loop controlled by a variable that doubles in size on each iteration and stops when the variable hits some limit N will run O(log N) times.

Useful Tip #2: 1 + 2 + 4 + ... + 2k = 2k+1 - 1

Now, let's look at the second piece of code:

m := 1;
FOR i := n downto 1 do
BEGIN
  m := m * 2;
  y := i MOD 2;
  x := m;
  WHILE x > y DO
  BEGIN
     x := x DIV 2;
     y := y*2
 END    
END

As before, notice that the variable m keeps doubling on each iteration. This will probably be interesting to note, because the value of m will be 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, etc. More generally, on iteration i, m has the value 2i.

Now, let's look at how much work that inner loop will do. Notice that x begins at the value of m, which is 2i. On each iteration of the loop, x decreases by a factor of two. This means that the maximum possible number of iterations of this loop is log m = log 2i = i. That's certainly nifty, since it means that the inner loop always runs at most i times!

Once we have that, determining the runtime isn't very hard. Since i counts down from N back to 0, the total work done will be at most

n + (n - 1) + (n - 2) + ... + 2 + 1 = O(n2)

Thus the runtime is O(n2).

Hope this helps!

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