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I have a problem with the Big O:

for i:=1 to n do
for j:=1 to i*i do 
begin
  k:=1; m:=n;
  while m>=k do 
  begin
    k:=k*3;
    m:=m/2
  end
end

Teacher gave the answer - n*n*n*log(n). However, I can't get there. That is supposed to be log for the basis 2. Please help.

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Do you understand any part of the answer? –  Neil Feb 1 '13 at 23:46

1 Answer 1

Here you see where the parts come from:

for i:=1 to n do      <-- n
for j:=1 to i*i do    <-- n*n
begin
  k:=1; m:=n;
  while m>=k do       <-- log(n)
  begin                    /
    k:=k*3;               /
    m:=m/2            <--+
  end
end

the loops are nested so you multiply their complexities

To understand the base 2 log, let's start with a simpler example:

  while m>=k do
  begin
    k:=k*2;
    m:=m/2
  end

this loop runs exactly ⌈(log n)/2⌉ times (base 2) because simply spoken m and k meet in the middle (not the exact middle of course!) after half of the time. The constant factor 0.5 is ignored in Big-O. For k:=k*3the case is similar, but the result will be between (log n)/2 (base 3) and (log n)/2 (base 2). I'll leave the math up to you, but you will understand that m:=m/2 has more significance because it starts from top to bottom.

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I don't understand how come that while has log(n) complexity. The problem is "k:=k*3;". It seems to me that the complexity is log(n),but for the basis of 6! –  user2034214 Feb 2 '13 at 11:46
    
Because log_b(n) to the basis b is equal to log_b(2^log(n)) = log_b(b^(log_b(2)))^log(n)) = log_b(b^(log_b(2))*log(n)) = log_b(2)*log(n) and log_b(2) is a constant factor which can be ignored in big-O –  BeniBela Feb 2 '13 at 13:16
    
@BeniBela: great explanation why the base does not matter in big-O. I edited the answer with a less mathematical explanation but I just realized, that was quite unnecessary :) –  fschmengler Feb 2 '13 at 13:24

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