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Possible Duplicate:
problem with Random.nextGaussian()

I am working to develop small java application to make random normal distribution and give 50 values. I use mean = 0.0 and std = 1.0, but the problem I got results out of the bounds there is some values less than 0.0 and else more than 1.0 , can anyone help me?

The following is the code that I used:

public static void main(String[] args) {

    double[] list = new double[50];
    double mean = 0.0, std = 1.0;
    Random rng = new Random();

            // to generate 50 values random normal distribution
    for(int i = 0;i<list.length;i++) {
      list[i] = mean + std * rng.nextGaussian();
    }

            // to print the generated values from the list
    for(int i = 0;i<list.length;i++) 
            {
            System.out.println(list[i]); 
    }


}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by pst, Donal Fellows, SztupY, hjpotter92, Jaime Feb 3 '13 at 6:06

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Read up some: javamex.com/tutorials/random_numbers/… "There is theoretically no absoluate minimum and maximum value that can occur in a normal distribution [or nextGaussian] .. In practice with Random.nextGaussian(), there will be some actual minimum/maximum, but not necessarily where we want it to be." – user166390 Feb 2 '13 at 0:08
    
0.2776371239704628 -0.5290507951247247 0.43804815423285853 0.20468905235819373 -0.2156071985528327 2.3685922348104165 0.4955808373446519 2.933460293720611 – user2034269 Feb 2 '13 at 0:14
1  
stackoverflow.com/questions/629798/… (some bug won't let me vote for a duplicate .. anyway, see the answers in there) – user166390 Feb 2 '13 at 0:20
1  
If you think numbers outside the range [0,1] are out of bounds for a standard normal (i.e., mean = 0 and std_dev = 1), you have a fundamental conceptual misunderstanding of the normal distribution. The red curve in this plot is a standard normal, and most of the values are outside the range [0,1]. – pjs May 13 '14 at 19:48

nextGaussian() Returns the next pseudorandom, Gaussian ("normally") distributed double value with mean 0.0 and standard deviation 1.0 from this random number generator's sequence. (http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/Random.html#nextGaussian())

So std * rng.nextGaussian(); should be std * (1 + rng.nextGaussian())/2;

However, the result may not be the gaussian you want, you need to tune the mean value and std with different a and b in (a + rng.nextGaussian())/b

share|improve this answer
    
thanks to answer, and I would ask if there any other way to generate 50 numbers random and make normal distribution for them. – user2034269 Feb 2 '13 at 0:21
    
@user2034269 Just target sigma-3 (or more, sigma-3 would mean 99.7% of the numbers fall in the range; sigma-1 only accounts for 70%) and clamp off the rest? The "clamping" technically alters the distribution, but at some point, who cares? :D – user166390 Feb 2 '13 at 0:25
    
@user2034269 nextDouble() should be the right one to use for 50 random numbers. I don't quite understand what do you mean by "make normal distribution for them." – Kaifei Feb 2 '13 at 0:25
    
@KFC That's uniform distribution though :( – user166390 Feb 2 '13 at 0:26

I don't think you're interpreting the meaning and purpose of nextGaussian() properly. If you want a number that is in the range [0.0, 1.0), use nextDouble() instead.

nextGaussian() uses a mean and a standard deviation, not a simple number range. Therefore, it has a theoretically infinite range of return values (within the bounds of double at least). Read more about nextGaussian() in this java doc

share|improve this answer
    
thanks to answer, and I would ask if there any other way to generate 50 numbers random and make normal distribution for them. – user2034269 Feb 2 '13 at 0:20
    
@user2034269 No, not really. Think of the normal distribution like height of all adults in a region. While most people are "about 6 feet" tall, there are outliers. A normal distribution just says "the more away from the mean/average, the less likely it is". See shortest people (< 2ft) and tallest people (> 8ft). Now, there could be a restriction on a distribution of people heights like: "a human adult can't live if they are < 1ft or > 9ft" and throw out any values that lie outside. – user166390 Feb 2 '13 at 0:33
    
aha, I got it know .. thanks for your simple example – user2034269 Feb 2 '13 at 0:41

I think you are confusing the standard deviation with the range of the values. They are not the same thing.

Taken from the Standard Deviation Wikipedia entry:

For example, each of the three populations {0, 0, 14, 14}, {0, 6, 8, 14} and {6, 6, 8, 8} has a mean of 7. Their standard deviations are 7, 5, and 1, respectively.

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To my understand Javadoc for nextGaussian() says:

Returns the next pseudorandom, Gaussian ("normally") distributed double value with mean 0.0 and standard deviation 1.0 from this random number generator's sequence.

It doesn't says the value will be from -1 to 1. Then if you want it to be in that values you can discard outside values or take -1 or 1 when the values are outside.

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