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This class won't generate any error:

public class AClass {
    AClass(AClass aClass)
    {
    }
}

This class clearly has no syntactic error, but semantically makes no sense, since it is impossible to create an object of AClass. From a language design perspective, why is this not addressed by Java?

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closed as not constructive by EJP, Peter O., Pshemo, Nix, rds Feb 2 '13 at 15:04

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3  
You could as well make a class with a single, private constructor that isn't used anywhere. And, having a class that cannot be instantiated can be an intention, like if you want to have a class with static methods only. –  Petr Pudlák Feb 2 '13 at 0:36
    
(a) It is not impossible to create an instance of that class. (b) Where exactly in the Java Language Specification does it say that classes with no apparent use are illegal? Not a real question. –  EJP Feb 2 '13 at 9:40
1  
AClass youAreWrong = new AClass(null) demonstrates that your assertion is incorrect: it is possible to create instances of this class –  rds Feb 2 '13 at 15:04

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Isn't this similar to the decorator pattern?

public class AClass {

    public static void main(String...args) {
        AClass a = new AClass(new BClass(new CClass(null)));
        a.print();
    }

    AClass child;
    AClass(AClass aClass) {
        child = aClass;
    }

    public void print() {
        if (child != null)
            child.print();
        else
            System.out.println("A Yo");
    }


}

class BClass extends AClass {

    BClass(AClass aClass) {
        super(aClass);
    }

    public void print() {       
        System.out.println("B Yo");
        super.print();
    }
}

class CClass extends AClass {
    CClass(AClass aClass) {
        super(aClass);
    }

    public void print() {       
        System.out.println("C Yo");
        super.print();
    }
}

outputs

B Yo
C Yo
A Yo
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That seems useful. But I still believe that using null where an object is excepted is a sign of a bad design. @G-Bach pointed to this other question related to the use of null in java: stackoverflow.com/questions/2707322/what-is-null-in-java –  Lay González Feb 2 '13 at 2:42

It's not impossible to create an instance of this class:

AClass a = new AClass(null);
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5  
And probably of more interest AClass a = new AClass(new AClass(null)); which could actually have some functional meaning. –  OldCurmudgeon Feb 2 '13 at 1:24

If javac can detect useless classes, we are all in big trouble:)

What if the class is just a place holder today, to be completed tomorrow.

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What do you mean? Of course you can create an instance of this class. It doesn't do much (only what it inherits from Object), but it's a perfectly viable class.

Addenda:

Works a treat...

public class AClass {
    AClass(AClass aClass)
    {
    }
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        AClass a = new AClass(null);

        System.out.println(a);
    }
}
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Take a deeper close at the constructor, it needs an object of that class. You would end up with something like this: AClass a = new AClass(new AClass(new AClass(... And never end. –  Lay González Feb 2 '13 at 0:33
3  
Not true, you can pass null. –  Will Hartung Feb 2 '13 at 0:35
    
Oh yes that's true. My bad. But then, why does java allow a null where an object is expected? –  Lay González Feb 2 '13 at 0:40
1  
That's allowed so you don't have to have gazillions of default instances so you can set variables to "this variable is not assigned". Also, this eases garbage collection since you can specifically destroy the references different objects hold. –  G. Bach Feb 2 '13 at 0:44
    
Also, and this might be interesting for everyone as a side note, see on the historicity and some debate about the usefulness of null: stackoverflow.com/questions/2707322/what-is-null-in-java –  G. Bach Feb 2 '13 at 0:51

The compiler shouldn't need to care about the semantics. For all it knows you want to do something useful with AClass.

AClass a = new AClass(null);
a.doSomething();
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It clearly has no syntactic error, but semantically makes no sense, since it is impossible to create an object of that class. From a language design perspective, why is this is not addressed by java?

A compiler would need the intelligence of an average Java programmer to figure out that that that class "makes no sense". It would need to start with figuring out the "purpose" of the class ... and whether the class fulfils that purpose.

Note that you can create a valid instance of this class (new AClass(null)). Even if you couldn't, that doesn't necessarily make the class useless. It is common practice to give "helper" classes a private constructor to prevent instantiation. So that is not a valid "makes no sense" criterion.

Even if compilers were capable of checking for code that "makes no sense", I don't think I'd want them bugging me about it. My code often goes through phases of being nonsensical. I don't want to be told, I don't want the compiler wasting CPU cycles looking ... and I'd prefer that the Compiler designers spent their valuable time on implementing stuff that will make my code go faster.

(This kind of stuff should be implemented in static code analysis tools like FindBugs, PMD ... if you are going to implement it at all. And in this particular case, I don't see the value of even doing that. Any programmer with half a brain would notice the problem within 2 seconds of trying to use the class. We don't need a tool to tell us ...)

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("that that" is not a typo ... in this context) –  Stephen C Feb 2 '13 at 1:06
    
I could even say that that that makes perfect sense :-) –  Stephen C Feb 2 '13 at 1:07

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