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I am interested in obtaining the number of nano seconds it would take to execute 1 double precision FLOP on GeForce GTX 550 Ti.

In order to do that I am following this approach: I found out that the single precision peak performance of the card is 691.2 GFLOPS, which means the double precision peak performance would be 1/8 of it i.e. 86.4 GFLOPS. Then in order to obtain FLOPS per core, I divide the 86.4 GFLOPS by the number of cores, 192, which gives me 0.45 GFLOPS per core. 0.45 GFLOPS means 0.45 FLOPS per nano second per core. If I am following the correct approach, then I would like to know how many threads per core are run to obtain these GFLOPS numbers and where can I find this info?

Moreover, my small test shown below executes in 236000232 cycles by one thread only. In order to find the time (in nano seconds) it takes to execute 1 iteration of the loop, I do 236000232/10^6 = 236 cycles. The shader clock of the card is 1800Mhz, which means it takes 236/1.8 = 131 nano seconds to execute one iteration of the loop. This number is much bigger than the one above (0.45 nanoseconds per core). I am sure that I am missing something here, because the numbers are very different. Please help me to understand the math behind it.

    __global__ void bench_single(float *data)
{
    int i;
    double x = 1.;
    clock_t start, end;
    start = clock();
    for(i=0; i<1000000; i++)
    {
        x = x * 2.388415813 + 1.253314137;
    }
    end = clock();
    printf("End and start %d - %d\n", end, start);
    printf("Finished in %d cycles\n", end-start);
}

Thank you,

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1  
What was the Grid configuration of your test? Remember, that there are latency and throughput for every instruction; single thread will execute a command with huge latency; but using many threads latency will be hidden by great throughput. So you can't divide total GFLOPS with cores to get latency. Also, according to radeon.ru/reference/nvidia/cardtable GF116 core has 691 single precision GFLOPS but 58 double precision (FP64) FLOPS. –  osgx Feb 2 '13 at 3:58
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2 Answers 2

Compute capability 2.1 devices has a double precision throughput of 4 operations per cycle (8 if doing DFMA). This assumes all 32 threads are active in the dispatched warp.

4 ops/cycle/SM * 4 SMs * 1800 MHz * 2 ops/DFMA = 56 GFLOPS double

The calculation assumes all threads in a warp are active.

The code in your question contains two dependent operations that could be fused into a DFMA. Use cuobjdump -sass to examine the assembly. If you launch multiple warps on the same SM the test turns into a measure of dependent instruction throughput not latency.

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1  
The code is also a victim of dead code removal. The whole loop won't be emitted by the compiler because it doesn't participate in a memory write anywhere –  talonmies Feb 2 '13 at 7:13
    
And if the loop was retained, the compiler could end up moving start = clock(); to after the loop, right? It would shorten the time and extra register was needed. –  Roger Dahl Feb 3 '13 at 2:00
    
@RogerDahl: That certainly used to happen rather often in older versions of the assembler. I am not sure whether that is still the case. –  talonmies Feb 3 '13 at 11:12
    
@Greg Smith: For example, if I run the kernel with <<<4,64>>> configuration, how does the runtime/compiler decide on how many warps to run on which SM's? –  Meriko Feb 4 '13 at 18:54
    
@Meriko: The CUDA Work Distributor dispatches thread blocks to SMs. The scheduling algorithm varies by architecture. As a developer you can use occupancy (e.g. shared memory per block) to help control the number of thread blocks per SM. –  Greg Smith Feb 4 '13 at 22:44
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You should be aware that there is a problem in design of the kernel which means that whatever measurements you make using this code will have absolutely no relationship to double precision instruction throughput.

Because the result of the computational loop containing all the double precision operations is not used in a memory write, it is getting removed by compiler optimisation. The CUDA 5 compiler emits the following PTX for your kernel:

.visible .entry _Z12bench_singlePf(
    .param .u32 _Z12bench_singlePf_param_0
)
{
    .local .align 8 .b8     __local_depot0[8];
    .reg .b32   %SP;
    .reg .b32   %SPL;
    .reg .s32   %r<16>;


    mov.u32     %SPL, __local_depot0;
    cvta.local.u32  %SP, %SPL;
    add.u32     %r3, %SP, 0;
    .loc 2 13 1
    cvta.to.local.u32   %r4, %r3;
    // inline asm
    mov.u32     %r1, %clock;
    // inline asm
    // inline asm
    mov.u32     %r2, %clock;
    // inline asm
    st.local.v2.u32     [%r4], {%r2, %r1};
    cvta.const.u32  %r5, $str;
    // Callseq Start 0
    {
    .reg .b32 temp_param_reg;
    .param .b32 param0;
    st.param.b32    [param0+0], %r5;
    .param .b32 param1;
    st.param.b32    [param1+0], %r3;
    .param .b32 retval0;
    .loc 2 13 1
    call.uni (retval0), 
    vprintf, 
    (
    param0, 
    param1
    );
    ld.param.b32    %r6, [retval0+0];
    }
    // Callseq End 0
    .loc 2 14 1
    sub.s32     %r7, %r2, %r1;
    cvta.const.u32  %r8, $str1;
    st.local.u32    [%r4], %r7;
    // Callseq Start 1
    {
    .reg .b32 temp_param_reg;
    .param .b32 param0;
    st.param.b32    [param0+0], %r8;
    .param .b32 param1;
    st.param.b32    [param1+0], %r3;
    .param .b32 retval0;
    .loc 2 14 1
    call.uni (retval0), 
    vprintf, 
    (
    param0, 
    param1
    );
    ld.param.b32    %r9, [retval0+0];
    }
    // Callseq End 1
    .loc 2 15 2
    ret;
}

The two clock load instructions are adjacent and the only other code is calls to printf. There is no computational loop in that PTX.

You should redesign your kernel so that the compiler can't deduce that the loop result is unused and optimise it away. One approach would be something like this:

__global__ 
void bench_single(float *data, int flag=0)
{
    int i;
    double x = 1.;
    clock_t start, end;
    start = clock();
    for(i=0; i<1000000; i++) {
        x = x * 2.388415813 + 1.253314137;
    }
    end = clock();
    printf("End and start %d - %d\n", end, start);
    printf("Finished in %d cycles\n", end-start);

    if (flag) {
        data[blockIdx.x] = x;
    }
}

The conditional write at the end of the kernel prevents the compiler for optimising the loop away, so now the compiler emits this PTX:

.visible .entry _Z12bench_singlePfi(
    .param .u32 _Z12bench_singlePfi_param_0,
    .param .u32 _Z12bench_singlePfi_param_1
)
{
    .local .align 8 .b8     __local_depot0[8];
    .reg .b32   %SP;
    .reg .b32   %SPL;
    .reg .pred  %p<3>;
    .reg .f32   %f<2>;
    .reg .s32   %r<28>;
    .reg .f64   %fd<44>;


    mov.u32     %SPL, __local_depot0;
    cvta.local.u32  %SP, %SPL;
    ld.param.u32    %r6, [_Z12bench_singlePfi_param_0];
    ld.param.u32    %r7, [_Z12bench_singlePfi_param_1];
    add.u32     %r10, %SP, 0;
    .loc 2 13 1
    cvta.to.local.u32   %r1, %r10;
    // inline asm
    mov.u32     %r8, %clock;
    // inline asm
    mov.f64     %fd43, 0d3FF0000000000000;
    mov.u32     %r27, 1000000;

BB0_1:
    .loc 2 10 1
    fma.rn.f64  %fd4, %fd43, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd5, %fd4, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd6, %fd5, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd7, %fd6, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd8, %fd7, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd9, %fd8, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd10, %fd9, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd11, %fd10, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd12, %fd11, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd13, %fd12, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd14, %fd13, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd15, %fd14, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd16, %fd15, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd17, %fd16, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd18, %fd17, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd19, %fd18, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd20, %fd19, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd21, %fd20, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd22, %fd21, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd23, %fd22, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd24, %fd23, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd25, %fd24, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd26, %fd25, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd27, %fd26, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd28, %fd27, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd29, %fd28, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd30, %fd29, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd31, %fd30, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd32, %fd31, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd33, %fd32, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd34, %fd33, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd35, %fd34, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd36, %fd35, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd37, %fd36, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd38, %fd37, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd39, %fd38, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd40, %fd39, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd41, %fd40, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd42, %fd41, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    fma.rn.f64  %fd43, %fd42, 0d40031B79BFF0AC8C, 0d3FF40D931FE078AF;
    .loc 2 9 1
    add.s32     %r27, %r27, -40;
    setp.ne.s32     %p1, %r27, 0;
    @%p1 bra    BB0_1;

    cvta.to.global.u32  %r5, %r6;
    // inline asm
    mov.u32     %r11, %clock;
    // inline asm
    .loc 2 13 1
    st.local.v2.u32     [%r1], {%r11, %r8};
    cvta.const.u32  %r12, $str;
    // Callseq Start 0
    {
    .reg .b32 temp_param_reg;
    .param .b32 param0;
    st.param.b32    [param0+0], %r12;
    .param .b32 param1;
    st.param.b32    [param1+0], %r10;
    .param .b32 retval0;
    .loc 2 13 1
    call.uni (retval0), 
    vprintf, 
    (
    param0, 
    param1
    );
    ld.param.b32    %r14, [retval0+0];
    }
    // Callseq End 0
    .loc 2 14 1
    sub.s32     %r15, %r11, %r8;
    cvta.const.u32  %r16, $str1;
    st.local.u32    [%r1], %r15;
    // Callseq Start 1
    {
    .reg .b32 temp_param_reg;
    .param .b32 param0;
    st.param.b32    [param0+0], %r16;
    .param .b32 param1;
    st.param.b32    [param1+0], %r10;
    .param .b32 retval0;
    .loc 2 14 1
    call.uni (retval0), 
    vprintf, 
    (
    param0, 
    param1
    );
    ld.param.b32    %r17, [retval0+0];
    }
    // Callseq End 1
    .loc 2 16 1
    setp.eq.s32     %p2, %r7, 0;
    @%p2 bra    BB0_4;

    .loc 2 17 1
    cvt.rn.f32.f64  %f1, %fd43;
    mov.u32     %r18, %ctaid.x;
    shl.b32     %r19, %r18, 2;
    add.s32     %r20, %r5, %r19;
    st.global.f32   [%r20], %f1;

BB0_4:
    .loc 2 19 2
    ret;
}

Note now there is a nice stream of floating point multiply-add instructions from the where the compiler partially unrolled the loop.

As Greg Smith pointed out, you shouldn't expect to get a real measure of instruction throughput until you have enough warps running on a given SM to overcome instruction scheduling latency. That probably means you will want to run at least one large block. Also note that the printf call will have a large negative influence on throughput. You will get a more representative number if you have only one thread per block write out its result, or (better still) store it to global memory. Run a large number of blocks and you will get a number of measurements you can average. As a final check, you should also disassemble the object code with cudaobjdump to ensure that the assembler doesn't move around the position of the clock read instructions, otherwise the in-kernel timing you rely on will break. Older versions of the assembler had a habit of instruction reordering that could break the functionality of a series of clock reads inserted into kernel C code or PTX.

share|improve this answer
    
I updated the question based on your recommendations, please see the Follow-up section. Basically, I can't see any clock function calls in my assembly output. Why? –  Meriko Feb 4 '13 at 18:46
    
@Meiko: That objdump you have shown doesn't look anything like updated kernel you posted. What toolchain and compilation arguments are you using? –  talonmies Feb 4 '13 at 19:12
    
I'm using VS 2008, CUDA Runtime API 5.0; compilation arguments: -arch=sm_21 --machine 32 -D_NEXUS_DEBUG -g -Xcompiler "/EHsc /W3 /nologo /Od /Zi /MT " -c –  Meriko Feb 4 '13 at 20:26
    
My fault. The output was different because I used the wrong file for cuobjdump. Problem solved. Thanks. –  Meriko Feb 4 '13 at 21:28
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