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Creating a library named "snap", I want a class named "log" which I put in a sub-namespace. Is it okay if the namespace is also "log"? (I know that it technically works, I'm wondering about proper naming conventions, what would you do?)

namespace snap
{
  namespace log
  {
    class log {
      ...
      enum log_level_t { ..., LOG_LEVEL_ERROR, ... };
      ...
    };
  }
}

The problem is that we end up with things like these:

snap::log::log::log_level_t ll(snap::log::log::LOG_LEVEL_ERROR);

Does that look strange to you? (i.e. double ::log::log)

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closed as not constructive by templatetypedef, Cornstalks, Mario, Björn Kaiser, Regexident Feb 2 '13 at 18:45

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Log::log seems good. Reminds me of the Post Versalog. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 2 '13 at 5:48
3  
I don't see how answers to this Q will help you. We are neither your co-workers nor future users of our code. Our opinions do not matter. What matters is the coding conventions for the organization or the opinions of the team you work with. –  Alok Save Feb 2 '13 at 5:51
1  
Alok, I'm working on a free project so the users will be anyone who'd find it useful. For that reason, I think that asking the community for advice is not out of scope. My organization has conventions in place that are built from input coming from different communities. –  Alexis Wilke Feb 2 '13 at 7:07

1 Answer 1

I don't know why you've defined the enum inside the class. If you have dedicated a `namespace to logging, then define all the logging related stuffs in the namespace. So I would prefer this instead:

namespace snap
{
  namespace log
  {
     enum log_level_t { ..., LOG_LEVEL_ERROR, ... };
     class log { };
  }
}

Moreover, since namespace log itself implies the things which are defiined inside it, are related to logging (or ought to be logging related), I feel the part log in log_level_t seems repetitive. I would further refactor the above into this:

namespace snap
{
  namespace logging //renamed
  {
     enum class level_t{verbose, info, error, ... }; //renamed, and used enum class!

     class logger { ... }; //renamed
  }
}

Or maybe, I would choose the name severity instead of level_t. Anyway, the usage becomes a bit better in my opinion:

logger.write(snap::logging::severity::error, message, etc);

Or you could write some friendly function, so that you could write this:

logger.verbose(message, etc);
logger.info(message, etc);
logger.error(message, etc);
//etc

Hope that helps.

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I like the logging and logger. For the name of the levels, I'll keep it that way as I'm using log4cplus as the backend and that way we use something similar to that (and it is also called level in syslog). I also have friendly functions, although these are globals that create a logger which is then used with () operators and the destructor sends the result to the actual log4cplus logger. I show a more complete implementation here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3213571/g-function-replace-time/… –  Alexis Wilke Feb 2 '13 at 7:32

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