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Is there is a built-in method in Java to sort a 2D array directly

For example: if I have an array of first name & phone number, can I sort it according to the first name while each name will keep it's phone number using built-in function?

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could you give a more specific description of the data structure youre trying to sort? code would be good. – radai Feb 2 '13 at 6:44
1  
Why don't you go for TreeMap? – exexzian Feb 2 '13 at 6:51
    
also, define directly – rds Feb 2 '13 at 15:09
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is your data structure [[name1, name2, ...], [phone1, phone2,...]] or [[name1, phone1], ...]? If it's the latter, you can use a comparator.

class NameAndPhoneComparator implements Comparator<String[]> {
    public int compare(String[] o1, String[] o2) {
        int c = o1[0].compareTo(o2[0]);
        if (c != 0) return c;
        return o1[1].compareTo(o2[1]);
    }
}

Then use Arrays.sort

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Make your 2d Array into a 1D array of the below class, then use built in methods with a custom Comparator to do the sorting. You could also make this class Comparable to itself.

class Person{
    public String name;
    public String phNumber;
}

Alternatively use a TreeMap,as sansix suggests, with the key as the name and value as phNumber. There would be no need for a comparator any more, and the Data will always be sorted.

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But by this the first name may lose his phone number and get a random one – Mohamed Mosaad Feb 2 '13 at 6:50
1  
@MohamedMosaad what?? – Karthik T Feb 2 '13 at 6:51
    
TreeMap is a good idea. – Ravindra Gullapalli Feb 2 '13 at 6:54

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