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class MyClass1
{
public:
  MyClass1()
  {
    init();
  }
  virtual void init()
  {
    printf("MyClass1 init");
  }
}

class MyClass2 : public MyClass1
{
public:
  virtual void init()
  {
    printf("MyClass2 init");
  }
}

int main()
{
  MyClass2 *obj = new MyClass2();
  return 0;
}

I would like for this to result

"MyClass2 init"

But it show the message Actually

"MyClass1 init"

How to call derived class virtual method from base class constructor ?

=== update1 ===

class MyClass1
{
public:
  MyClass1()
  {
    init();
  }
  virtual void init()
  {
    printf("MyClass1 init");
  }
}

class MyClass2 : public MyClass1
{
public:
  MyClass2()
    : MyClass1()
  {
  }

  virtual void init()
  {
    printf("MyClass2 init");
  }
}

I hope MyClass2 override MyClass1 init method But it still show "MyClass1 init"

How C++ works like java/C# override method ?

=== update2 ===

class MyClass1
{
public:
  MyClass1()
  {
    init();   <--- can't work like test method ??? 
  }
  void test()
  {
    init();   <--- work fine
  }
  virtual void init()
  {
    printf("MyClass1 init");
  }
}

class MyClass2 : public MyClass1
{
public:
  MyClass2()
    : MyClass1()
  {
  }

  virtual void init()
  {
    printf("MyClass2 init");
  }
}

I know obj->init() will call MyClass2::init.
but I hope C++ can run in Constructor method.

Although obj->init() can be resolved.
But I hope that the code can write a little less.
Some people forget to call init().

Java/C# can Write less do more. But C++ can't.... This is very frustrating.

share|improve this question
    
Calling virtual functions from your base class constructor isn't a very wise choice. Why can't you just call the derived init from the derived constructor? – chris Feb 2 '13 at 9:08
    
Doing what you kinda kinda defeats the purpose of polymorphism.. The constructor of MyClass2 will get called anyway, by the way. – user1520427 Feb 2 '13 at 9:10
4  
You can't. The derived class doesn't exist yet to be called on. – GManNickG Feb 2 '13 at 9:14
    
Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/14290132/… – Remy Lebeau Feb 2 '13 at 10:56
    
thanks for Remy Lebeau – Flash Feb 2 '13 at 11:39

Generally speaking, you can't. That's because the MyClass2 constructor has not yet been run, so if MyClass2::init() were to be called, any member variable would be uninitialized. Until this constructor is started the object, for virtual purposes, is considered to be a MyClass1 instance.

For example:

class MyClass2 : public MyClass1
{
private:
    std::string xxx;
public:
    virtual void init()
    {
        xxx = "ops!"; //undefined if called from base class constructor
    }
};

The assignment to xxx will render undefined behavior, because its constructor has not yet been run.

Given your lack of ending ; I'm guessing your background in Java/C#. These languages have implemented this issue differently, but that's just how C++ works.

share|improve this answer
    
But i hope C++ can override method, How C++ works like java/C# override method ? – Flash Feb 2 '13 at 10:09
    
@Flash: Of course it can. The difference is that in C++, if you call a virtual method from a constructor of the base class, then the call will not be overriden. Once the object has been fully constructed the virtual method will work as expected. It works like this to protect you from errors like the one in my example code. – rodrigo Feb 2 '13 at 10:28
    
Java/C# can Write less do more. But C++ can't.... This is very frustrating. – Flash Feb 2 '13 at 10:37
    
@Flash: These rules are there for a reason. If you don't like C++, by all means, do not use it. But if you use it, then you have to follow the rules. The fact that they are different than those on your favourite language doesn't make them "less", just "different". – rodrigo Feb 2 '13 at 11:05

Clearly during the construction of MyClass2, MyClass1's constructor will be called first, that's base class parts of derived class objects are constructed before derived class parts are. Even when you clearly try to create object of MyClass2, but during base class construction, virtual functions never go down into derived classes.

Because base class constructors execute before derived class constructors, derived class data members have not been initialized when base class constructors run. If virtual functions called during base class construction went down to derived classes, the derived class functions would almost certainly refer to local data members, but those data members would not yet have been initialized which will cause undefined behavior.

Refer to your classes, why do you have virtual init in the first place? Constructors should do the work respectively.

How to call derived class virtual method from base class constructor ?

It's bad idea, should never ever do that!

class MyClass1
{
public:
  virtual ~MyClass1() { }
  virtual void doSomething()
  {
    printf("MyClass1 init");
  }
};

class MyClass2 : public MyClass1
{
public:
  virtual void doSomething()
  {
    printf("MyClass2 init");
  }
};

int main()
{
  MyClass1*obj = new MyClass2();
  obj->doSomething();
  delete obj;
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
How C++ works like java/C# override method ? – Flash Feb 2 '13 at 10:08
    
you mark base function virtual, overwrite it in derived class. then when you call: MyClass1 *obj = new MyClass2(); obj->init();, MyClass2::init will be called – billz Feb 2 '13 at 10:15
    
I know obj->init() will call MyClass2::init. but I hope C++ can run in Constructor method. – Flash Feb 2 '13 at 10:27
    
C++ doesn't work that way. why do you want it? That' refers to design a proper C++ application. – billz Feb 2 '13 at 10:29
    
Although obj->init() can be resolved. But I hope that the code can write a little less. Some people forget to call init(). – Flash Feb 2 '13 at 10:31
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think:
No reason C++ can not do java/C# virtual contructor mechanism.
I want to break the C++ rules.
I also hope that C++ can write less to do more.
Would not progress if C++ does not improve, so that more people can not easily entry.

class MyClass1
{
public:
  MyClass1()
  {
    init();
  }

  typedef void (MyClass1::virtual_init)();
  MyClass1(virtual_init vinit)
  {
    (this->*vinit)();
  }

  //virtual void init()
  void init()
  {
    printf("MyClass1 init");
  }
}

class MyClass2 : public MyClass1
{
public:
  MyClass2()
    : MyClass1(&MyClass2::init)
  {
  }

  //virtual void init()
  void init()
  {
    printf("MyClass2 init");
  }
}
share|improve this answer

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