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I started to learn Python, and now I'm learning the great benefits of argparse. Using argparse, I have created two groups of arguments: group_list and group_simulate. Each of the groups has its own arguments -- the user can specify only one argument in each group (achieved using parser.add_mutually_exclusive_group()).

And now my target is present a syntax error if the user specified arguments from both groupgs and not from only one of them -- I want to achieve this by using the capabilities of argparse and not by writing a method that asks if this and this was specified print syntax error.

import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(
        description='this is the description',
        epilog="This is the epilog",
        argument_default=argparse.SUPPRESS  
        )

parser.add_argument('-v', '--verbose', help='verbose', action='store_true', default=False)

group_list = parser.add_mutually_exclusive_group()
group_list.add_argument('-m', help='list only modules', action='store_const', dest='list', const='modules', default='all')
group_list.add_argument('-p', help='list only ports', action='store_const', dest='list', const='ports', default='all')
group_list.add_argument('--list', help='list only module or ports', choices=['modules','ports'], metavar='<modules/ports>', default='all')

group_simulate = parser.add_mutually_exclusive_group()
group_simulate.add_argument('-M', help='simulate module down', nargs=1, metavar='module_name', dest='simulate')
group_simulate.add_argument('-P', help='simulate FC port down', nargs=1, metavar='fc_port_name', dest='simulate')
group_simulate.add_argument('-I', help='simulate iSCSI port down', nargs=1, metavar='iSCSI_port_name', dest='simulate')
group_simulate.add_argument('--simulate', help='simulate module or port down', nargs=1, dest='simulate')

args = parser.parse_args()

print args

So talking more specifically:

allowed:

test.py
output: Namespace(list='all', verbose=False)
test.py -m
output: Namespace(list='modules', verbose=False)
test.py -P asfasf
output: Namespace(P=['asfasf'], list='all', verbose=False)

not allowed:

test.py -m -P asfsaf
expected output: <the help message>
test.py -P asfasf -m
expected output: <the help message>

I have tried to achieve the wanted target with the option of add_subparsers from argparse but without any success.

So my question is how to achieve this situation?

share|improve this question
    
what is then the difference to throwing all mutually exclusive args in one group? –  Theodros Zelleke Feb 2 '13 at 10:49
1  
@TheodrosZelleke Using multiple mutually-exclusive groups you can, for example, pass the required argument to only some of them. Having a single mutually exclusive group you can't do this. An other advantage is that the help message is a bit more informative if using more than a single mutually exclusive group. Also, in the future some more information about the mutually-exclusive group might be provided(e.g. title and description), and thus it would show more informative help messages. –  Bakuriu Feb 2 '13 at 10:52
1  
@Bakuriu -- but if one group is required to provide an arg, does't that immediately exclude all other groups? –  Theodros Zelleke Feb 2 '13 at 10:57
    
I would agree the if an argument is defined as required, this will be in conflict with the add_mutually_exclusive - since you you will have to specify this argument and will not be able to specify other arguments, this is how I understand it. in the case above I didn't use any required arguments. –  Elia Feb 2 '13 at 11:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use a common mutually-exclusive-group as "root" of the two subgroups:

import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(
        description='this is the description',
        epilog="This is the epilog",
        argument_default=argparse.SUPPRESS  
        )

parser.add_argument('-v', '--verbose', help='verbose', action='store_true', default=False)

root_group = parser.add_mutually_exclusive_group()

group_list = root_group.add_mutually_exclusive_group()
group_list.add_argument('-m', help='list only modules', action='store_const', dest='list', const='modules', default='all')
group_list.add_argument('-p', help='list only ports', action='store_const', dest='list', const='ports', default='all')
group_list.add_argument('--list', help='list only module or ports', choices=['modules','ports'], metavar='<modules/ports>', default='all')

group_simulate = root_group.add_mutually_exclusive_group()
group_simulate.add_argument('-M', help='simulate module down', nargs=1, metavar='module_name', dest='simulate')
group_simulate.add_argument('-P', help='simulate FC port down', nargs=1, metavar='fc_port_name', dest='simulate')
group_simulate.add_argument('-I', help='simulate iSCSI port down', nargs=1, metavar='iSCSI_port_name', dest='simulate')
group_simulate.add_argument('--simulate', help='simulate module or port down', nargs=1, dest='simulate')

args = parser.parse_args()

print args

Result:

$ python test.py -m -P asfafs
usage: test.py [-h] [-v] [[-m | -p | --list <modules/ports>]
                [-M module_name | -P fc_port_name | -I iSCSI_port_name | --simulate SIMULATE]
test.py: error: argument -P: not allowed with argument -m 
$ python test.py -m -p
usage: test.py [-h] [-v] [[-m | -p | --list <modules/ports>]
                [-M module_name | -P fc_port_name | -I iSCSI_port_name | --simulate SIMULATE]
test.py: error: argument -p: not allowed with argument -m
share|improve this answer
1  
This is exactly what I was looking for! Thank you very much Bakuriu –  Elia Feb 2 '13 at 10:49
    
Nesting groups like this works, but does not do anything significant. When an action is added to group_simulate it gets added to root_group as well. It is also added to parser and its optional arguments group. The net effect is that all 7 actions are mutually exclusive. Also the usage code does not handle nested groups. Note the [[ and the lack of | between the nested groups. –  hpaulj Aug 1 '13 at 2:03
    
It turns out that while group_simulate has a container attribute that points to the root_group, root_group does not have a list of its nested groups. There is a _mutually_exclusive_groups attribute, but this is shared (same reference) among the parser and all groups (exclusive or not). bugs.python.org/issue10984 has a patch with a formatter that can display overlapping exclusive groups - but it show's each group independently, not nested. –  hpaulj Aug 1 '13 at 2:22

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