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I have a user control which has a CheckBox, a Button, and a CommandBinding. If the CheckBox is checked, the Button is enabled. The MainWindow uses the UserControl. When the Button in the main window is pressed, the UserControl is removed from UI, and GC.Collect() is called, but CanExecute method still runs.

I find that if I click the button in main window twice, CanExecute will no longer run. It seems that I don't call GC.Collect() at the right time.

I want to know what is the good timing to call GC to clean the unused user control, so that CanExecute will not be called.

XAML

<UserControl x:Class="WpfApplication1.UserControl1"
             xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
             xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
             xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006" 
             xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008" 
             mc:Ignorable="d" 
             d:DesignHeight="300" d:DesignWidth="300">
    <UserControl.Resources>
        <RoutedUICommand x:Key="okCommand" Text="OK"/>
    </UserControl.Resources>
    <UserControl.CommandBindings>
        <CommandBinding Command="{StaticResource okCommand}" CanExecute="CommandBinding_CanExecute_1"/>
    </UserControl.CommandBindings>
    <StackPanel>
        <CheckBox Name="checkBox" Content="CheckBox"/>
        <Button Command="{StaticResource okCommand}" Content="{Binding Path=Text, Source={StaticResource okCommand}}"/>
    </StackPanel>
</UserControl>

Code behind

public partial class UserControl1 : UserControl
{
    public UserControl1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void CommandBinding_CanExecute_1(object sender, CanExecuteRoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        e.CanExecute = checkBox.IsChecked.GetValueOrDefault(false);

        System.Media.SystemSounds.Beep.Play();
    }
}

MainWindow

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        Title="MainWindow" Loaded="Window_Loaded_1">
    <StackPanel>
        <Border Name="container"/>

        <Button Content="Set Null" Click="Button_Click_1"/>
    </StackPanel>
</Window>

Code behind

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void Button_Click_1(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        container.Child = null;

        GC.Collect();
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
    }

    private void Window_Loaded_1(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        UserControl1 uc = new UserControl1();
        container.Child = uc;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
What exactly are you trying to do here? Calling the GC methods are usually never a good idea, there are very few cases where you know better than the GC to "hint" him to make a collect run. Even if you call Collect, the GC can still decide not to do it. And why are you creating a UserControl in code? And remember creation and cleanup of WPF Controls is not bound to the GC its a process that WPF handles and it usually takes a couple of "frames". –  dowhilefor Jul 15 '13 at 9:25
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2 Answers

Use grid as container and Container.Clear() method and forget about GC.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you mean Grid.Children.Clear() , since I don't find Clear method on Grid? –  LoveRight Feb 3 '13 at 3:19
    
oh sorry, yes i meant Grid.Children.Clear(). –  Taras Feb 3 '13 at 13:15
    
Sorry, but in my test, your method didn't work. –  LoveRight Feb 6 '13 at 0:54
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I find another solution. That is to call CommandBindings.Clear() in UserControl1 when it unloads.

I believe this is a neat way, since the caller of UserControl1 doesn't take care of the cleaning job of UserControl1.

share|improve this answer
    
Just a hint, if you use the Unloaded event; It might not work like you expect. "Unloaded cannot be assumed to occur only on navigation away from the page." –  dowhilefor Jul 15 '13 at 9:30
    
Thanks. But I'm not using navigation and usercontrol is not a page. –  LoveRight Jul 24 '13 at 0:41
1  
Page is not meant in the page sense, i expect a bad use of words in the msdn. Its about all controls. And it means that even if your view is still visible, you might get an Unloaded directly followed by a Loaded event. For example, if the user switches the windows theme. –  dowhilefor Jul 24 '13 at 8:24
    
OK. I will pay attention to this situation you mentioned. Thanks. –  LoveRight Jul 24 '13 at 10:17
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