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I'm in the process of learning Erlang. As an exercise I picked up the Sieve of Eratosthenes algorithm of generating prime numbers. Here is my code:

-module(seed2).
-export([get/1]).

get(N) -> WorkList = lists:duplicate(N, empty),
          get(2, N, WorkList, []).

get(thats_the_end, _N, _WorkList, ResultList) -> lists:reverse(ResultList);
get(CurrentPrime, N, WorkList, ResultList) -> ModWorkList = markAsPrime(CurrentPrime, N, WorkList),
                                              NextPrime = findNextPrime(CurrentPrime + 1, N, WorkList),
                                              get(NextPrime, N, ModWorkList, [CurrentPrime|ResultList]).


markAsPrime(CurrentPrime, N, WorkList) when CurrentPrime =< N -> WorkListMod = replace(CurrentPrime, WorkList, prime),
                                                                 markAllMultiples(CurrentPrime, N, 2*CurrentPrime, WorkListMod).

markAllMultiples(_ThePrime, N, TheCurentMark, WorkList) when TheCurentMark > N -> WorkList;
markAllMultiples(ThePrime, N, TheCurrentMark, WorkList) -> WorkListMod = replace(TheCurrentMark, WorkList, marked),
                                                           markAllMultiples(ThePrime, N, TheCurrentMark + ThePrime, WorkListMod).

findNextPrime(Iterator, N, _WorkList) when Iterator > N -> thats_the_end;
findNextPrime(Iterator, N, WorkList) -> I = lists:nth(Iterator, WorkList),
                                        if
                                          I =:= empty -> Iterator;
                                          true -> findNextPrime(Iterator + 1, N, WorkList)
                                        end.

replace(N, L, New)-> {L1, [_H|L2]} = lists:split(N - 1, L),
                     lists:append(L1, [New|L2]).

This code actually works :) . The problem is that I have this feeling that it is not the best possible implementation.

My question is what would be the "erlangish" way of implementing the "Sieve of Eratosthenes"

EDIT: OK, Andreas solution is very good but it is slow. Any ideas how to improve that?

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This question appears to be off-topic because it belongs to codereview.stackexchange.com –  M42 Feb 1 at 17:42
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closed as primarily opinion-based by Charles, Second Rikudo, Ed Cottrell, M42, sjngm Feb 1 at 18:11

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

13 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Here's a simple (but not terribly fast) sieve implementation:

-module(primes).
-export([sieve/1]).
-include_lib("eunit/include/eunit.hrl").

sieve([]) ->
    [];
sieve([H|T]) -> 		 
    List = lists:filter(fun(N) -> N rem H /= 0 end, T),
    [H|sieve(List)];
sieve(N) ->
    sieve(lists:seq(2,N)).
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Wow, That's exacty what I've looked for. It is way simpler and faster then mine solution. Thanks !!! Only one question what is the -include_lib("eunit/include/eunit.hrl"). line about? –  Roskoto Oct 6 '08 at 8:48
    
Oh, that's a piece of boilerplate that followed along. It's for using EUnit, the Erlang Unit testing library. Glad you found the code helpful :) –  Andreas Oct 7 '08 at 16:21
    
EDIT: OK, Andreas solution is very good but it is slow. Any ideas how to improve that? –  Roskoto Oct 10 '08 at 8:28
    
Roskoto, see my answer. This answer's code, beautiful as it is, is not the Sieve of Eratosthenes. –  Darius Bacon Dec 24 '08 at 5:18
    
@DariusBacon what makes you say that? –  Agis Apr 4 '13 at 18:46
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The paper discussed here explains why the algorithm most people have been suggesting here is slow and not the classical Sieve, along with how to code the 'right' algorithm functionally, with Haskell code that could easily be ported to Erlang.

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Here's my sieve implementation which uses list comprehensions and tries to be tail recursive. I reverse the list at the end so the primes are sorted:

primes(Prime, Max, Primes,Integers) when Prime > Max ->
    lists:reverse([Prime|Primes]) ++ Integers;
primes(Prime, Max, Primes, Integers) ->
    [NewPrime|NewIntegers] = [ X || X <- Integers, X rem Prime =/= 0 ],
    primes(NewPrime, Max, [Prime|Primes], NewIntegers).

primes(N) ->
    primes(2, round(math:sqrt(N)), [], lists:seq(3,N,2)). % skip odds

Takes approx 2.8 ms to calculate primes up to 2 mil on my 2ghz mac.

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I'm working through the eulers in erlang. I am going to steal this turd, and study it. There is significantly less overhead in this implementation. –  EvilTeach Sep 27 '11 at 2:31
    
Same here. I don't mind borrowing a solution when all I'm really after is understanding the language (and my own solutions don't work). –  bibby Nov 5 '11 at 6:04
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I approached the problem by using concurrent processing.

Source

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Thanks for the quick response! I'll defiantly read your post. My question is actually not related to concurrency, just plain old sequential programming. The code end up to be too long compared to a C implementation so maybe there is a better way? –  Roskoto Sep 28 '08 at 20:22
    
imho, your code is quite reasonable. The intent of your question seemed to be on the order of, how can I make this more erlangish. Concurrency is the place where the language is strong. That is the reason i pointed you to mine. –  EvilTeach Sep 29 '08 at 1:09
    
Getting concurrency working with the sieve is a bit of a problem, as data is not shared between subprocesses. That complicates things. This is one of the reasons I didn't use that algorithm. You should also take a look at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sieve_of_Atkin for a different spin on things. –  EvilTeach Sep 29 '08 at 1:13
    
EvilTeach, I voted up your answer because it is a good one. I still can't accept is as the final answer though. If my code is a reasonable one I'm quite disappointed from the functional programming in general. This easy algorithm can be implemented so much more easily in C. –  Roskoto Sep 29 '08 at 7:29
    
Ok. I don't have a problem with that. Here is the real question then. How could concurrency be used to make the sieve work? –  EvilTeach Sep 29 '08 at 14:00
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My previous post did not get formatted correctly. Here is a repost of the code. Sorry for spamming...


-module(test).

%%-export([sum_primes/1]).
-compile(export_all).

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%Sum of all primes below Max. Will use sieve of Eratosthenes 
sum_primes(Max) ->
    LastCheck = round(math:sqrt(Max)),
    All = lists:seq(3, Max, 2), %note are creating odd-only array
    %%Primes = sieve(noref,All, LastCheck),
    Primes = spawn_sieve(All, LastCheck),
    lists:sum(Primes) + 2. %adding back the number 2 to the list


%%sieve of Eratosthenes
sieve(Ref,All, LastCheck) ->
    sieve(Ref,[], All, LastCheck).

sieve(noref,Primes, All = [Cur|_], LastCheck) when Cur > LastCheck ->
    lists:reverse(Primes, All); %all known primes and all remaining from list (not sieved) are prime    
sieve({Pid,Ref},Primes, All=[Cur|_], LastCheck) when Cur > LastCheck ->
    Pid ! {Ref,lists:reverse(Primes, All)}; 
sieve(Ref,Primes, [Cur|All2], LastCheck) ->
    %%All3 = lists:filter(fun(X) -> X rem Cur =/= 0 end, All2),
    All3 = lists_filter(Cur,All2),
    sieve(Ref,[Cur|Primes], All3,  LastCheck).


lists_filter(Cur,All2) ->
    lists_filter(Cur,All2,[]).

lists_filter(V,[H|T],L) ->
    case H rem V of
    0 ->
        lists_filter(V,T,L);
    _ ->
        lists_filter(V,T,[H|L])
    end;
lists_filter(_,[],L) ->
    lists:reverse(L).


%% This is a sloppy implementation ;)
spawn_sieve(All,Last) ->
    %% split the job
    {L1,L2} = lists:split(round(length(All)/2),All),
    Filters = filters(All,Last),
    L3 = lists:append(Filters,L2),
    Pid = self(),
    Ref1=make_ref(),
    Ref2=make_ref(),
    erlang:spawn(?MODULE,sieve,[{Pid,Ref1},L1,Last]),
    erlang:spawn(?MODULE,sieve,[{Pid,Ref2},L3,Last]),
    Res1=receive
         {Ref1,R1} ->
    	 {1,R1};
         {Ref2,R1} ->
    	 {2,R1}
     end,
    Res2= receive
          {Ref1,R2} ->
    	  {1,R2};
          {Ref2,R2} ->
    	  {2,R2}
      end,
    apnd(Filters,Res1,Res2).


filters([H|T],Last) when H 
    [H|filters(T,Last)];
filters([H|_],_) ->
    [H];
filters(_,_) ->
    [].


apnd(Filters,{1,N1},{2,N2}) ->
    lists:append(N1,subtract(N2,Filters));
apnd(Filters,{2,N2},{1,N1}) ->
    lists:append(N1,subtract(N2,Filters)).



subtract([H|L],[H|T]) ->
    subtract(L,T);
subtract(L=[A|_],[B|_]) when A > B ->
    L;
subtract(L,[_|T]) ->
    subtract(L,T);
subtract(L,[]) ->
    L.

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I haven't studied these in detail, but I've tested my implementation below (that I wrote for a Project Euler challenge) and it's orders of magnitude faster than the above two implementations. It was excruciatingly slow until I eliminated some custom functions and instead looked for lists: functions that would do the same. It's good to learn the lesson to always see if there's a library implementation of something you need to do - it'll usually be faster! This calculates the sum of primes up to 2 million in 3.6 seconds on a 2.8GHz iMac...

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%Sum of all primes below Max. Will use sieve of Eratosthenes 
sum_primes(Max) ->
    LastCheck = round(math:sqrt(Max)),
    All = lists:seq(3, Max, 2), %note are creating odd-only array
    Primes = sieve(All, Max, LastCheck),
    %io:format("Primes: ~p~n", [Primes]),
    lists:sum(Primes) + 2. %adding back the number 2 to the list

%sieve of Eratosthenes
sieve(All, Max, LastCheck) ->
    sieve([], All, Max, LastCheck).

sieve(Primes, All, Max, LastCheck) ->
    %swap the first element of All onto Primes 
    [Cur|All2] = All,
    Primes2 = [Cur|Primes],
    case Cur > LastCheck of 
    	true ->
    		lists:append(Primes2, All2); %all known primes and all remaining from list (not sieved) are prime
    	false -> 
    		All3 = lists:filter(fun(X) -> X rem Cur =/= 0 end, All2),
    		sieve(Primes2, All3, Max, LastCheck)

	end.
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Correction: In testing on my machine, my implementation was orders of magnitude faster than Alnitak's but less than 3X faster than Roskoto's. The differences between all of these only become appreciable at numbers over 100K or so. –  Jay Mooney Nov 14 '08 at 17:02
    
Critiquing my own code, I mixed sieve functions into sum. A cleaner sieve would start: sieve(Max) -> All = lists:seq(3, Max, 2), LastCheck = round(math:sqrt(Max)), sieve([], All, Max, LastCheck). –  Jay Mooney Nov 14 '08 at 17:13
    
Hi BarryE, Thank you for your interest to this question and the solution. Looking in to your code I find the Andreas idea with lists:filter(rem). Keep in mind that rem is extremely slow operration, besides is in not part of the original algorithm witch uses summing. –  Roskoto Nov 15 '08 at 21:19
    
What makes your code faster is the LastCheck = round(math:sqrt(Max)) thing which if used properly in the array solution will make it the fastest solution. –  Roskoto Nov 15 '08 at 21:21
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I kind of like this subject, primes that is, so I started to modify BarryE's code a bit and I manged to make it about 70% faster by making my own lists_filter function and made it possible to utilize both of my CPUs. I also made it easy to swap between to two version. A test run shows:

61> timer:tc(test,sum_primes,[2000000]).
{2458537,142913970581}

Code:



-module(test).

%%-export([sum_primes/1]).
-compile(export_all).

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%Sum of all primes below Max. Will use sieve of Eratosthenes 
sum_primes(Max) ->
    LastCheck = round(math:sqrt(Max)),
    All = lists:seq(3, Max, 2), %note are creating odd-only array
    %%Primes = sieve(noref,All, LastCheck),
    Primes = spawn_sieve(All, LastCheck),
    lists:sum(Primes) + 2. %adding back the number 2 to the list


%%sieve of Eratosthenes
sieve(Ref,All, LastCheck) ->
    sieve(Ref,[], All, LastCheck).

sieve(noref,Primes, All = [Cur|_], LastCheck) when Cur > LastCheck ->
    lists:reverse(Primes, All); %all known primes and all remaining from list (not sieved) are prime    
sieve({Pid,Ref},Primes, All=[Cur|_], LastCheck) when Cur > LastCheck ->
    Pid ! {Ref,lists:reverse(Primes, All)}; 
sieve(Ref,Primes, [Cur|All2], LastCheck) ->
    %%All3 = lists:filter(fun(X) -> X rem Cur =/= 0 end, All2),
    All3 = lists_filter(Cur,All2),
    sieve(Ref,[Cur|Primes], All3,  LastCheck).


lists_filter(Cur,All2) ->
    lists_filter(Cur,All2,[]).

lists_filter(V,[H|T],L) ->
    case H rem V of
    0 ->
        lists_filter(V,T,L);
    _ ->
        lists_filter(V,T,[H|L])
    end;
lists_filter(_,[],L) ->
    lists:reverse(L).



%% This is a sloppy implementation ;)
spawn_sieve(All,Last) ->
    %% split the job
    {L1,L2} = lists:split(round(length(All)/2),All),
    Filters = filters(All,Last),
    %%io:format("F:~p~n",[Filters]),
    L3 = lists:append(Filters,L2),
    %%io:format("L1:~w~n",[L1]),
    %%    io:format("L2:~w~n",[L3]),
    %%lists_filter(Cur,All2,[]).
    Pid = self(),
    Ref1=make_ref(),
    Ref2=make_ref(),
    erlang:spawn(?MODULE,sieve,[{Pid,Ref1},L1,Last]),
    erlang:spawn(?MODULE,sieve,[{Pid,Ref2},L3,Last]),
    Res1=receive
         {Ref1,R1} ->
    	 {1,R1};
         {Ref2,R1} ->
    	 {2,R1}
     end,
    Res2= receive
          {Ref1,R2} ->
    	  {1,R2};
          {Ref2,R2} ->
    	  {2,R2}
      end,
    apnd(Filters,Res1,Res2).


filters([H|T],Last) when H 
    [H|filters(T,Last)];
filters([H|_],_) ->
    [H];
filters(_,_) ->
    [].


apnd(Filters,{1,N1},{2,N2}) ->
    lists:append(N1,subtract(N2,Filters));
apnd(Filters,{2,N2},{1,N1}) ->
    lists:append(N1,subtract(N2,Filters)).



subtract([H|L],[H|T]) ->
    subtract(L,T);
subtract(L=[A|_],[B|_]) when A > B ->
    L;
subtract(L,[_|T]) ->
    subtract(L,T);
subtract(L,[]) ->
    L.
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you could show your boss this: http://www.sics.se/~joe/apachevsyaws.html. And some other (classic?) erlang arguments are:

-nonstop operation, new code can be loaded on the fly.

-easy to debug, no more core dumps to analyse.

-easy to utilize multi core/CPUs

-easy to utilize clusters maybe?

-who wants to deal with pointers and stuff? Is this not the 21 century? ;)

Some pifalls: - it might look easy and fast to write something, but the performance can suck. If I want to make something fast I usually end up writing 2-4 different versions of the same function. And often you need to take a hawk eye aproach to problems which might be a little bit different from what one is used too.

  • looking up things in lists > about 1000 elements is slow, try using ets tables.

  • the string "abc" takes a lot more space than 3 bytes. So try to use binaries, (which is a pain).

All in all i think the performance issue is something to keep in mind at all times when writing something in erlang. The Erlang dudes need to work that out, and I think they will.

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Have a look here to find 4 different implementations for finding prime numbers in Erlang (two of which are "real" sieves) and for performance measurement results:

http://caylespandon.blogspot.com/2009/01/in-euler-problem-10-we-are-asked-to.html

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Simple enough, implements exactly the algorithm, and uses no library functions (only pattern matching and list comprehension). Not very powerful, indeed. I only tried to make it as simple as possible.

-module(primes).
-export([primes/1, primes/2]).

primes(X) -> sieve(range(2, X)).
primes(X, Y) -> remove(primes(X), primes(Y)).

range(X, X) -> [X];
range(X, Y) -> [X | range(X + 1, Y)].

sieve([X]) -> [X];
sieve([H | T]) -> [H | sieve(remove([H * X || X <-[H | T]], T))].

remove(_, []) -> [];
remove([H | X], [H | Y]) -> remove(X, Y);
remove(X, [H | Y]) -> [H | remove(X, Y)].
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Here is my sieve of eratophenes implementation C&C please:

    -module(sieve).
    -export([find/2,mark/2,primes/1]).

    primes(N) -> [2|lists:reverse(primes(lists:seq(2,N),2,[]))].

    primes(_,0,[_|T]) -> T;
    primes(L,P,Primes) -> NewList = mark(L,P),
        NewP = find(NewList,P),
        primes(NewList,NewP,[NewP|Primes]).

    find([],_) -> 0;
    find([H|_],P) when H > P -> H;
    find([_|T],P) -> find(T,P). 


    mark(L,P) -> lists:reverse(mark(L,P,2,[])).

    mark([],_,_,NewList) -> NewList;
    mark([_|T],P,Counter,NewList) when Counter rem P =:= 0 -> mark(T,P,Counter+1,[P|NewList]);
    mark([H|T],P,Counter,NewList) -> mark(T,P,Counter+1,[H|NewList]). 
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Here is my sample

S = lists:seq(2,100),
lists:foldl(fun(A,X) -> X--[A] end,S,[Y||X<-S,Y<-S,X<math:sqrt(Y)+1,Y rem X==0]).

:-)

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  sethvargo Jan 31 at 21:51
    
@sethvargo, as it actually happens, this does answer the question. This question dates from 2008, when "show me the best" was on-topic, and this is an answer to the question. The question is no longer on topic and should be closed, however. –  Charles Jan 31 at 22:00
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my fastest code so far (faster then Andrea's) is with using array:

-module(seed4).
-export([get/1]).

get(N) -> WorkList = array:new([{size, N}, {default, empty}]),
          get(2, N, WorkList, []).

get(thats_the_end, _N, _WorkList, ResultList) -> lists:reverse(ResultList);
get(CurrentPrime, N, WorkList, ResultList) -> ModWorkList = markAsPrime(CurrentPrime, N, WorkList),
                                              NextPrime = findNextPrime(CurrentPrime + 1, N, WorkList),
                                              get(NextPrime, N, ModWorkList, [CurrentPrime|ResultList]).


markAsPrime(CurrentPrime, N, WorkList) when CurrentPrime =< N -> WorkListMod = replace(CurrentPrime, WorkList, prime),
                                                                 markAllMultiples(CurrentPrime, N, 2*CurrentPrime, WorkListMod).

markAllMultiples(_ThePrime, N, TheCurentMark, WorkList) when TheCurentMark > N -> WorkList;
markAllMultiples(ThePrime, N, TheCurrentMark, WorkList) -> WorkListMod = replace(TheCurrentMark, WorkList, marked),
                                                           markAllMultiples(ThePrime, N, TheCurrentMark + ThePrime, WorkListMod).

findNextPrime(Iterator, N, _WorkList) when Iterator > N -> thats_the_end;
findNextPrime(Iterator, N, WorkList) -> I = array:get(Iterator - 1, WorkList),
                                        if
                                          I =:= empty -> Iterator;
                                          true -> findNextPrime(Iterator + 1, N, WorkList)
                                        end.

replace(N, L, New) -> array:set(N - 1, New, L).
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