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As an example: I have a python script scip.py with

from sys import argv

# parsing the input
script, NU = argv

def main(NU):
    return 

def somefunc():
    return

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main(NU)

Assume I am in a [I]python shell. I can run the script e.g. via run scip.py 1 . But how can I import the functions from it? import scip fails, because it needs variables to unpack. import scip 1 gives a SyntaxError.

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4  
"Doctor, it hurts when I do this". Move the script, NU = argv line inside if __name__ == '__main__' check. –  Pavel Anossov Feb 2 '13 at 13:24
    
Oh yes sure, that solves it. But I hope, I don't run into other trouble later. –  Jan Feb 2 '13 at 13:27
1  
Why would you run into trouble? When you include this from another module you would use args from that script. Right? Otherwise what is the use of abstracting these functions. –  RickyA Feb 2 '13 at 13:38
1  
Think about it logically. What should happen, conceptually, when you run the script? What should happen, conceptually, when you import it? In particular, why would you expect to look at sys.argv when you import it? –  Karl Knechtel Feb 2 '13 at 13:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

this should do the trick:

def main(NU):
    return 

def somefunc():
    return

if __name__ == '__main__':
    from sys import argv

    # parsing the input
    script, NU = argv
    main(NU)
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