Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to create a Perl hash from an input string, but I'm having problems with the original 'split', as values may contain quotes. Below is an example input string, and my (desired) resulting hash:

my $command = 'CREATE:USER:TEL,12345678:MOB,444001122:Type,Whatever:ATTRIBUTES,"ID,0,MOB,123,KEY,VALUE":TIME,"08:01:59":FIN,0';

my %hash = 
  (
   CREATE     => '',
   USER       => '',
   TEL        => '12345678',
   MOB        => '444001122',
   Type       => 'Whatever',
   ATTRIBUTES => 'ID,0,MOB,123,KEY,VALUE',
   TIME       => '08:01:59',
   FIN        => '0',
  );

The input string is of arbitrary length, and the number of keys is not set.

Thanks!

-hq

share|improve this question
    
In $hash{ATTRIB} value there are MOB,123. Where do they come from? –  dave Feb 2 '13 at 13:33
5  
Don't re-invent the wheel, use a csv parsing library. –  Colonel Panic Feb 2 '13 at 13:35
    
Do you mean the key ATTRIB to be ATTRIBUTES? –  Borodin Feb 2 '13 at 14:08
    
My bad. I fixed the ATTRIBUTES confusion. So $hash{'ATTRIBUTES'}="ID,0,MOB,123,KEY,VALUE" and I fixed the $command string as well. –  h q Feb 3 '13 at 17:19

4 Answers 4

Use Text::CSV. It handles comma separated value files correctly.

Update

It seems the format of your input is not parsable by the standard module, even with sep_char and allow_loose_quotes. So, you have to do the heavy lifting yourself, but you can still use Text::CSV to parse each key-value pair:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;
use feature qw(say);

use Data::Dumper;

use Text::CSV;

my $command = 'CREATE:USER:TEL,12345678:MOB,444001122:Type,Whatever:ATTRIBUTES,"ID,0,KEY,VALUE":TIME,"08:01:59":FIN,0';

my @fields = split /:/, $command;
my %hash;
my $csv = Text::CSV->new();

my $i = 0;
while ($i <= $#fields) {
    if (1 == $fields[$i] =~ y/"//) {
        my $j = $i;
        $fields[$i] .= ':' . $fields[$j] until 1 == $fields[++$j] =~ y/"//;
        $fields[$i] .= ':' . $fields[$j];
        splice @fields, $i + 1, $j - $i, ();
    }
    $csv->parse($fields[$i]);
    my ($key, $value) = $csv->fields;
    $hash{$key} = "$value"; # quotes turn undef to q()
    $i++;
}

print Dumper \%hash;
share|improve this answer
    
The separtor is ':' and as far as I can see you cannot change the separator in this module.. –  bliof Feb 2 '13 at 13:45
    
@bliof: You can. See the sep_char option of the constructor. –  choroba Feb 2 '13 at 13:47
    
My fault.. I searched for separator.. +1 –  bliof Feb 2 '13 at 13:59
    
-1: If you actually try this, you will see that you can't get it to handle fields like TIME,"08:01:59" –  Borodin Feb 2 '13 at 14:01
    
@Borodin: I tried. The format is ugly :-) –  choroba Feb 2 '13 at 14:15

As far as I can see the most obvious candidate - Text::CSV - won't handle this format properly, so a home-grown regular expression solution is the only one.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $command = 'CREATE:USER:TEL,12345678:MOB,444001122:Type,Whatever:ATTRIBUTES,"ID,0,KEY,VALUE":TIME,"08:01:59":FIN,0';

my %config;
for my $field ($command =~ /(?:"[^"]*"|[^:])+/g) {
  my ($key, $val) = split /,/, $field, 2;
  ($config{$key} = $val // '') =~ s/"([^"]*)"/$1/;
}

use Data::Dumper;
print Data::Dumper->Dump([\%config], ['*config']);

output

%config = (
            'TIME' => '08:01:59',
            'MOB' => '444001122',
            'Type' => 'Whatever',
            'CREATE' => '',
            'TEL' => '12345678',
            'ATTRIBUTES' => 'ID,0,KEY,VALUE',
            'USER' => '',
            'FIN' => '0'
          );

If you have Perl v5.10 or later then you have the convenient (?| ... ) regular expression group, which allows you to write this

use 5.010;
use warnings;

my $command = 'CREATE:USER:TEL,12345678:MOB,444001122:Type,Whatever:ATTRIBUTES,"ID,0,KEY,VALUE":TIME,"08:01:59":FIN,0';

my %config = $command =~ /(\w+) (?| , " ([^"]*) " | , ([^:"]*) | () )/gx;

use Data::Dumper;
print Data::Dumper->Dump([\%config], ['*config']);

which produces identical results to the code above.

share|improve this answer
    
That is very impressive. Thanks a million. –  h q Feb 3 '13 at 17:28
    
This is very elegant, again. I had no idea you can do it in a single line... I even do chomp($command); and $command = s/;$//;. I'll try to see if I can include that in your solution. Kind regards. –  h q Feb 4 '13 at 6:24

This looks like something Text::ParseWords could handle. The quotewords subroutine will split the input on the delimiter :, ignoring delimiters inside quotes. This will give us the basic list of items, seen first in the output as $VAR1. After that, it is a simple matter of parsing the comma separated items with a regex which will handle optional second capture to accommodate empty tags such as those for CREATE and USER.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;
use Text::ParseWords;

while (<DATA>) {
    chomp;
    my @list = quotewords(':', 0, $_);
    my %hash = map { my ($k, $v) = /([^,]+),?(.*)/; $k => $v; } @list;
    print Dumper \@list, \%hash;
}

__DATA__
CREATE:USER:TEL,12345678:MOB,444001122:Type,Whatever:ATTRIBUTES,"ID,0,KEY,VALUE":TIME,"08:01:59":FIN,0

Output:

$VAR1 = [
          'CREATE',
          'USER',
          'TEL,12345678',
          'MOB,444001122',
          'Type,Whatever',
          'ATTRIBUTES,ID,0,KEY,VALUE',
          'TIME,08:01:59',
          'FIN,0'
        ];
$VAR2 = {
          'TIME' => '08:01:59',
          'MOB' => '444001122',
          'Type' => 'Whatever',
          'CREATE' => '',
          'TEL' => '12345678',
          'ATTRIBUTES' => 'ID,0,KEY,VALUE',
          'USER' => '',
          'FIN' => '0'
        };
share|improve this answer
my %hash = $command =~ /([^:,]+)(?:,((?:[^:"]|"[^"]*")*))?/g;
s/"([^"]*)"/$1/g
   for grep defined, values %hash;
share|improve this answer
    
I intentionally left the missing values (foo:bar) undefined so you can distinguish them from empty values (foo,:bar,). –  ikegami Feb 2 '13 at 14:24
    
Thank you. This is great. How would you change it to allow empty values (e.g., don't need to distinguish)? –  h q Feb 4 '13 at 6:21
    
Why s/"([^"]*)"/$1/g instead of s/^"(.*)"$/$1/ ? –  h q Feb 4 '13 at 6:26
    
Because I've allowed "foo"bar"baz", so I need to dequote that. –  ikegami Feb 4 '13 at 13:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.