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I need to loop through a list of emails and to check that they validate. If one fails to validate, I throw an error to let Mocha know about it.

it('validates valid email addresses', function (done) {
  [
    'oliverash@me.com',
    'oliver.ash@me.com',
    'oliver-ash@me.com',
    'oliver+ash@me.com',
    'oliver\'s-email@me.com'
  ].forEach(function (value) {
    user.email = value

    user.validate(function (err) {
      // Failed to validate, throw an error
      if (err) {
        throw new Error()
      }
    })
  })

  // All documents validated, so call `done`
  done()
})

This code doesn't seem to work right, however – only the last email in the array will invalidate if it is invalid.

What am I doing wrong?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use the async utility library to simplify do an asynchronous loop.

it('validates valid email addresses', function (done) {
  async.forEach([
    'oliverash@me.com',
    'oliver.ash@me.com',
    'oliver-ash@me.com',
    'oliver+ash@me.com',
    'oliver\'s-email@me.com'
  ], 
  function (value, callback) {
    user.email = value
    user.validate(callback)
  },
  function (err) {
    if (err) {
      throw new Error()
    }
    done()
  })
})

The first function is called on each element in the array, it takes two arguments: the item from the array, and a callback function. If the callback receives an error, it immediately goes stops iterating. Once all of the items in the array are done (or any of them return an error), the final function is called. In this example it'll either throw an error or run the Mocha done function.

The readme for async has a good explanation of how the forEach function works.

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This looks promising, although I still have the problem of only the last email address counting. If any of the others are invalid, the test will still pass. The validation itself is fine, it's the test that's the problem. –  Oliver Joseph Ash Feb 2 '13 at 15:20
    
It turns out, this is because I don't want the loop iterations to happen in parallel. I need them to happen one after the other, I think. This is because user.email = value is equating to the last item in the array, if that makes sense. –  Oliver Joseph Ash Feb 2 '13 at 15:24
    
If it's for unit testing only, you can replace forEach by forEachSeries to make everything synchronous and avoid getting user.email with the last email always. –  DaFunix Feb 2 '13 at 15:24
    
Yes! That's perfect. Thank you. I take it I still need to use async? –  Oliver Joseph Ash Feb 2 '13 at 15:28
    
Obviously. forEachSeries is part of async. Moreover, async is a great librairy that you should use when dealing with asynchronous code, will save you A LOT of headaches :) –  DaFunix Feb 2 '13 at 15:30

If your user.validate function is asynchronous, your forEach call will not wait the callback call of user.validate.

Which mean that your forEach function will end before user.validate calls all callbacks and will call done() before every validation has ended.

You should use all parameters of forEach function and call done() in the user.validate callback. I will add one count variable to count callback called and know when I need to call done() function.

it('validates valid email addresses', function (done) {
  var count = 0;     // count variable
  [
    'oliverash@me.com',
    'oliver.ash@me.com',
    'oliver-ash@me.com',
    'oliver+ash@me.com',
    'oliver\'s-email@me.com'
  ].forEach(function (value, index, array) {
    user.email = value;

    user.validate(function (err) {
      ++count;      // Callback called, we add +1 to count.
      if (err) {
        throw new Error();
      }
      // Check if all callbacks have been called and call done if true.
      if (count === array.length)
        done();
    });

  });

})

This should work better. I didn't tested it, but it should work.

PS: Please do not forget semicolons. It can brings you undefined behavior in some cases and it's a bad habbits to not put them (we are programmers !).

EDIT - 08/06/13: Just read something about semicolons in Javascript and remembered about this thread, this is why you should put semicolons in your code : http://bonsaiden.github.io/JavaScript-Garden/#core.semicolon

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explanation. Here, done will still call even if an error has been thrown in an earlier iteration, meaning the test will always pass. I guess I'll have to set another flag to circumvent that? Also I'm using index instead of count – bit more efficient. –  Oliver Joseph Ash Feb 2 '13 at 14:59
    
P.S. no semicolon is my choice of coding style. Perfectly fine to do in JS. –  Oliver Joseph Ash Feb 2 '13 at 14:59
    
Well, you get the point. I do not use index, because sometimes, the callback for index 4 will be called before callback for index 0, meaning that you will get the same problem. You can't know when a callback is going to be called as well as if they will be called in the right order. In fact, done() will be called only if no callback has throw a new Error() because we check it before trying to call done (). If a new Error() is thrown, the execution stop and Mocha, with it() call, will catch the error and end the test. Else, you call done() adn everything is fine ! –  DaFunix Feb 2 '13 at 15:05
    
Hmm, okay. Then how come this test passes? It only seems to catch the validation error if the invalid email is the last one in the array. gist.github.com/4697762/… –  Oliver Joseph Ash Feb 2 '13 at 15:11

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