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How can i get a list of branches which are only final branches (which are not parents of any other commits) - other words branches which are tips of commit tree (final nodes). I expected some option like --final or --tips in git branch command but there only --merged, --no-merged and --contains options.

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Since Git saves a commit's parents and not its children, it's not so simple to find leaf nodes (the "tips" you describe) in the history graph. It would be relatively easy to write a script to find out what you want to know, but it would require to walk over all commits in your repo. –  Nevik Rehnel Feb 2 '13 at 16:00
    
I want to find branches which can be deleted by me. For example if i will delete branches in not leaf nodes tips i will make to cleaning of not useful branches for me. Any not final branches can be restored because their commits will be inside of tree. –  Perlover Feb 7 '13 at 21:32

5 Answers 5

Since branches are just labels that move when a new commit is added while it is active in the working directory -- all branches are 'by definition' leaf nodes of the tree.

But I think you are asking for those branch that share no common ancestor with another branch's leaf commit. Such that you want C and E, but not A, B or D in the below.

-A-o-B-o-C
      \
       D-o-E

If that is the case, it would be possible to find a list of all branches that do not share a common ancestor that is the leaf commit of another branch. For instance, D and E share the common ancestor of D's current leaf commit.

This could likely be done with scripting, but I don't know of a git command that does it for you, for all branches. But git has surprised me in the past with what can be done with combinations of its (sometimes obscure) command parameters.


I did some more thinking after your comment, and I think I better understand why what your asking is not going to be possible (or likely useful) as a command. This is because command like git merge --squash <branch> do not create merge commits. The commit created is just another regular commit -- containing nothing that says it came from another branch.

For instance, starting with:

-A-o-B-o-C
      \
       D-o-E

and with HEAD at C the command git merge --squash E will put all the changes contained in E in the index ready to be commited. Once commited the tree would look like

-A-o-B-o-o-C    <== notice branch `C` has moved forward one commit
      \
       D-o-E

The commit at C now contains all the changes from D-o-E with nothing to say where it came from. D-o-E is likely not needed now, but there is nothing but knowledge of the project to tell you that.

With it understood what you want to do is going to be a manual process; I did think of a couple of commands that may help you determine if a branch can be removed.

This git log command produces a graph of just the commits that are decorated (branches, tags and HEAD).

git log --all --graph --oneline --simplify-by-decoration --decorate

Running this will give you a visual which should allow you to quickly see where the 'end-point' branches are. HINT: add >> <filename>.txt to dump the graph to a text file that can be marked up with a pencil.

Also, once you've identified an 'end-point' branch you want to keep, run the following command to see an ancestorial list of branches from <branch>. This is listing the branches that are fully merged (with a merge commit) into <branch>.

git branch --merged <branch>

This may not be exactly what you want -- but as I explained above, I don't think it is going to be possible. Hopefully these commands will help.

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Yes, i want to find C & E branches, not A, B, D in your example. For example i have a repository with many branches and i want to make cleaning of branch refs. –  Perlover Feb 7 '13 at 21:35

If you get a list of all the refs, you can list all the refs that are not a parent of another ref:

refs=`git show-ref -s`
git log --oneline --decorate $refs --not `echo "$refs" | sed 's/$/^/'`

This works by filtering out all the parent commits.

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I think this won't work: not all refs have a file in the refs directory, some of them are in the packed-refs file. –  svick Feb 3 '13 at 20:04
    
Also, for some reason, your code doesn't work at all for me: it doesn't return anything. –  svick Feb 3 '13 at 20:06
    
Thanks @svick, I replaced find with git show-refs –  AtnNn Feb 3 '13 at 20:26
    
No git show-refs There is git show-ref But your lines nothing output And what did you want to make by s/$/^/? For example: $ echo $refs 722aaacadeb64136d19dab91c7516682c2a8c796 3b242412889ca1101914c2834858ebdc9efa4839 There are spaces between refs. I tried s/ /\n/g but it doesn't help to define leaf nodes :( –  Perlover Feb 7 '13 at 21:26
    
Sorry, there were two typos in the code. –  AtnNn Feb 7 '13 at 23:53
git branch -v --no-abbrev | sed 's/./ /' | sort -k2 >@branches
git rev-list --branches --children | grep -v ' ' | sort >@tips 
join -1 2 @branches @tips
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I think you want a list of branch pointers. This is basically a list of references to commits that are at the end of branches. These are typically referred to as master or HEAD, but can be any branch name.

example

git branch -a
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There are some useful answers already but not giving what is asked for: a list or branches (to me that means branch names, not commit IDs).

Getting list of tip branch names

{
        echo "** Below is list of tip branches a.k.a. final nodes."
        echo "** These aren't reachable from any other branches."
        echo "** Removing them is potentially DANGEROUS: it would make some commit unreachable."
        TIPS=$( git rev-list --branches --children | grep -v ' ' | sort )
        { while read branchname commitid message
                do grep $commitid < <(echo $TIPS) -q && echo $branchname
                done
        } < <(git branch -v --no-abbrev | sed 's/\*//' )
        echo "** end of list"
}

Result looks like this:

** Below is list of tip branches a.k.a. final nodes.
** These aren't reachable from any other branches.
** Removing them is potentially DANGEROUS: it would make some commit unreachable.
feature-workingonit
dev
** end of list

Getting list of non-tip branch names

When tidying things up, you may want to see the non-tip branches. Here's a way to get a list of them. The only change is && becoming ||.

{
        echo "** Below is list of non-tip branches a.k.a. inner nodes."
        echo "** These are reachable from other branches."
        echo "** If you remove them, all commits would stay reachable, but be careful anyway."
        TIPS=$( git rev-list --branches --children | grep -v ' ' | sort )
        { while read branchname commitid message
                do grep $commitid < <(echo $TIPS) -q || echo $branchname
                done
        } < <(git branch -v --no-abbrev | sed 's/\*//' )
        echo "** end of list"
}

Result looks like this:

** Below is list of non-tip branches a.k.a. inner nodes.
** These are reachable from other branches.
** If you remove them, all commits would stay reachable, but be careful anyway.
feature-alreadymerged
master
** end of list

Getting list of non-tip branch names with commit ids and message

You can decorate as you wish, for example by changing:

echo $branchname

into

echo -e "$branchname\t$commitid\t$message"

Result then looks like this:

** Below is list of non-tip branches a.k.a. inner nodes.
** These are reachable from other branches.
** If you remove them, all commits would stay reachable, but be careful anyway.
feature-alreadymerged   426ac5186841876163970afdcc5774d46641abc4    Cool feature foo, ref task #1234
master  39148238924687239872eea425c0e837fafdcfd9    Some commit
** end of list

You can then review those branches in your favorite tool to see if it makes sense to remove them.

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