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I'm trying to understand the concept of operator overloading by writing some simple, silly tests. I thought this might be useful as this helps me understand C++ better.

Why does this example implementing a concatenation operator of Animal class and std::string not compile? G++ gives me the following error:

extra qualification 'Animal::' on member 'operator+' [-fpermissive]

This is the code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Animal {

public:
    string _type;
    string _name;
    string _sound;


    Animal & Animal::operator+(const string & o);
};


Animal & Animal::operator+(const string & o) {
    cout << "plus operator \n";
    this->_name=o;
    return *this;
}


int main( int argc, char ** argv ) {
    Animal a;

    a+"hhh";
    cout<<a._name;
    return 0;
}
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3  
This operator should be called += or <<! The + operator isn't supposed to modify the object. –  leemes Feb 2 '13 at 16:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
Animal & Animal::operator+(const string & o);

Is invalid. It should be:

Animal & operator+(const string & o);

Also, your implementation of a simple addition operator, results in the modifications of one of the operands. This is never a good thing for an addition operator.

For example:

int a, b = 5, c = 3;
a = b + c;

That doesn't change the values of either operands; it leaves b and c untouched, and returns an entirely different instance.

You should therefore not overload the addition operator, but the addition assignment compound operator (+=):

Animal & operator+=(const string & o);

And of course change the implementation and calls to it accordingly:

Animal & Animal::operator+=(const string & o) {
    cout << "plus operator \n";
    this->_name=o;
    return *this;
}

And:

a += "hhh";
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The declaration of operator+ inside your class does not need to be qualified, precisely because it is being declared within the class:

class Animal {
  // ...
  Animal& operator+(const string& o);
}

This qualification is necessary when you define the function because you define it outside the class - the compiler needs to know to which class the function belongs.

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There's no need for the Animal:: in the prototype, because it's inside the Animal class already. Just use:

Animal & operator+(const string & o);
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The Animal:: qualification should be used in the definition of a member function, not in the declaration. Thus, change your operator declaration into:

Animal & operator+(const string & o);
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