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I abstracted out a sorted list that I need to keep in C. One way is best for reading and the other for writing.

WRITE: search KeyNumeric then KeyAlpha and write *Data

Key1 : [ KeyA, *Data1A, KeyB, *Data1B, KeyC, *Data1C ]
Key2 : [ KeyA, *Data2A, KeyB, *Data2B, KeyC, *Data2C ]
Key3 : [ KeyA, *Data3A, KeyB, *Data3B, KeyC, *Data3C ]


READ: search KeyAlpha then KeyNumeric and read *Data

KeyA : [ Key1, *Data1A, Key2, *Data2A, Key3, *Data3A ]
KeyB : [ Key1, *Data1B, Key2, *Data2B, Key3, *Data3B ]
KeyC : [ Key1, *Data1C, Key2, *Data2C, Key3, *Data3C ]

Does anyone recognize what would be the most efficient way to represent this data structure in memory?

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Do the rows always have the same length as in your example? Is a delete op needed? –  Gene Feb 2 '13 at 17:34
    
Insert and delete are rare as compared to read and write. Do whatever with the length, the solution will work either way. –  BAR Feb 2 '13 at 17:38
1  
what are you reading and writing to? If you are writing pointers to a file, this probably won't work. –  Josh Petitt Feb 2 '13 at 18:13
1  
The way to ask this question is to give a complete API of required operations: insert, modify, lookup, delete, etc. Include also the relative frequency of operations. So far you say modify and lookup occur more often than insert and delete. This is a start. You should also give an idea of how big the data are and whether persistent storage and/or streaming are needed. –  Gene Feb 2 '13 at 18:30
1  
Are the numeric keys dense (1, 2, 3) or sparse (23, 296, 600)? Are the alpha keys from a restricted set or open-ended? Will the data be read into the program from a 'file' (external data source) or will it be constant data compiled into the program? –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 2 '13 at 19:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If I understand correctly:

  • your data has a composite key that consists of a number and some kind of alphabetic (you don't say if it's a character or a string).
  • Sometimes you have the alpha-key, and need to search for the numeric, and sometimes vice-versa (it happens to be read and (over)write, but that's beside the point, probably).
  • Insert and delete are rare but need to be supported.

I'm also going to assume that the data keys are sparse, so a straight "[N][A]" array is not going to work for you.

Since you want the data to be double indexed, I'd suggest that you need some kind of linked structure: either a list or a tree.

To do it with linked lists, your C structure might look like this:

struct stuff {
  int num_key;
  char alpha_key;

  /* The number-first lists.  */
  struct {
    struct stuff *next_num;
    struct stuff *next_alpha;
  } num_list;

  /* The alpha-first links.  */
  struct {
    struct stuff *next_alpha;
    struct stuff *next_num;
  } alpha_list;

  struct data Data;
};

So, if you have data items 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, 2C, 3A, 3B, 3C these links would work like this:

  • 1A num_list.next_num points to 2A.
  • 1A num_list.next_alpha points to 1B.
  • 1A num_alpha.next_alpha points to 1B.
  • 1A num_alpha.next_num points to 2A.
  • 2B num_list.next_num is NULL.
  • 2B num_list.next_alpha points to 2C.
  • 2B num_alpha.next_alpha is NULL.
  • 2B num_alpha.next_num points to 3B.

So, in words, num_list.next_num always points to something with the next number, but the first letter available. Similarly, alpha_list.next_alpha always points to something with the next letter, but the first number available. If you're not looking at the head of the secondary list then pointer for the primary list is NULL because you never want to traverse the data that way, and maintaining a real pointer there would either cause bugs, or cause extra maintenance on insert or delete.

You can think of it as two lists of lists:

  • num_list.next_num is a list of the heads of the num_list.next_alpha lists.
  • aplha_list.next_alpha is a list of the heads of the alpha_list.next_num lists.

To find an item, you first move across one of the primary lists, num_list.next_num or aplha_list.next_alpha, and then down one of the secondary lists, num_list.next_alpha or num_alpha.next_num.


So, clearly there are some efficiency issues with this:

  • malloc of all these little data blocks is inefficient.
  • lists are O(n) to access.

If you are dealing with large quantities of data I would do two things:

  1. Use some kind of balanced tree instead of flat lists. The 'heads of the lists' then becomes the 'roots of the trees'.

  2. Allocated a fixed-sized array of struct stuff and use array indexes as the links, instead of pointers. Then simply maintain a "free list" of unused slots. If your data out-grows the array then use realloc or allocate a second memory block and remember which indexes lie in which block.

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The linked list is actually the first thing I came up with. But then I started thinking it would be faster to store all *data in contiguous memory. This would make the search faster, and only reference data once when found instead of each time to find its key. –  BAR Feb 2 '13 at 18:39
    
Speed has only a little to do with storage method. If your lists are 1000 elements long, a list will require checking on average 500 of them. A binary search or balanced tree lookup will require checking no more than 11. A hash table can be configured to need only 1. The point is, though @ams answered your question in a reasonable way because it was so vague, you never asked a question in a useful way. –  Gene Feb 2 '13 at 19:02
    
On thinking about this, I decided that maintaining a full set of pointers would probably get you in a muddle when you want to insert or delete nodes. I've changed the example to show NULL where the pointers are not really necessary. –  ams Feb 4 '13 at 11:28
    
As @Gene says, a balanced tree will be much more speed efficient than a list, but your double indexing means you'll have trouble finding any "contiguous memory" solution that gives you speed (although, as I said in the answer, it will make it more memory efficient). –  ams Feb 4 '13 at 11:31

A good general way of handling the multiple indexing you're asking about is with a hash table of pairs and a commutative hash function where the order of alpha and numeric keys does not matter:

typedef struct hash_node_s {
  struct hash_node_s *next;
  char *keyAlpha;
  unsigned keyNumeric;
  void *data
} HASH_NODE, *HASH_NODE_PTR;

#define HASH_TABLE_SIZE 997
typedef HASH_NODE_PTR HASH_TABLE[HASH_TABLE_SIZE];

// Hash a string and integer in one value.
unsigned hash(char *keyAlpha, unsigned keyNumeric) {
  unsigned h = 0;
  for (int i = 0; keyAlpha[i]; i++) {
    h = h * 31 ^ keyAlpha[i] ^ keyNumeric;
    keyNumeric *= 31;
  }
  return h;
}

static HASH_NODE *find_or_insert(HASH_TABLE tbl, char *keyAlpha, unsigned keyNumeric) {
  unsigned h = hash(keyAlpha, keyNumeric) % HASH_TABLE_SIZE;
  for (HASH_NODE *p = tbl[h]; p; p = p->next)
    if (strcmp(keyAlpha, p->keyAlpha) == 0 && keyNumeric == p->keyNumeric)
      return p;
  HASH_NODE *n = safe_malloc(sizeof *n);
  n->next = tbl[h];
  n->keyAlpha = safe_strdup(keyAlpha);
  n->keyNumeric = keyNumeric;
  n->data = NULL;
  tbl[h] = n;
  return n;
}

void insert(HASH_TABLE tbl, char *keyAlpha, unsigned keyNumeric, void *data) {
  find_or_insert(keyAlpha, keyNumeric)->data = data;
}

void write(HASH_TABLE tbl, unsigned keyNumeric, char *keyAlpha, void *data) {
  find_or_insert(keyAlpha, keyNumeric)->data = data;
}

void *read(HASH_TABLE tbl, char *keyAlpha, unsigned keyNumeric) {
  return find_or_insert(keyAlpha, keyNumeric)->data;
}

void delete(HASH_TABLE tbl, char *keyAlpha, unsigned keyNumeric)
{
  unsigned h = hash(keyAlpha, keyNumeric) % HASH_TABLE_SIZE;
  for (HASH_NODE *q = NULL, *p = tbl[h]; 
       p; 
       q = p, p = p->next)
    if (strcmp(keyAlpha, p->keyAlpha) == 0 && keyNumeric == p->keyNumeric) {
      if (q) 
        q->next = p->next;
      else 
        tbl[h] = p->next;
      safe_free(p->keyAlpha);
      safe_free(p);
      return;
    }
}

This code is untested, but it ought to be reliable except for minor typos.

All operations have about the same cost. Computing the hash function depends on the key length. Other than this, all operations are probabilistically O(1), meaning that unless you run into a bad case where the hash function does not produce pseudo-random results or you let the table load get too high, this will be very fast indeed.

The weakness of this code is that it stores two keys per element, and the string keys may be arbitrarily large. But this can be fixed by using a separate string table (hash table for strings) so that duplicate strings are represented by the same pointer. String table insertion and deletion (when a reference count reaches zero) would replace the safe_strdup and free calls. In all other cases the code will remain the same. With this the storage overhead is an integer and a pointer per data item.

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Is this optimized for search or for insert/delete? –  BAR Feb 4 '13 at 18:56
    
All operations have about the same cost. Computing the hash function depends on the key length. Other than this, all operations are probabilistically O(1), meaning that unless you run into a bad case where the hash function does not produce pseudo-random results or you let the table load get too high, this will be very fast indeed. I should have mentioned that my code is untested, but it ought to be reliable except for minor typos. –  Gene Feb 5 '13 at 1:00

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