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Consider the following situation:

I have a page it will have following fields:

pageid, title, content, like, follow, field1, field2..., field100, pagecomments, images

Like and follow is counter field that will increase on each click.

Now i am thinking of designing this in Cassandra in following ways:

**TYPE A** page_table { 
    page_id, 
    title, 
    content, 
    like, 
    follow,
    posted_by,
    datetime,
    image1,
    image2,
    field1,
    field2..., 
    field100
}

page_comments {
    commentid, 
    page_id,text, 
    comment_like, 
    posted_by,
    datetime
}

**TYPE B** page_table {
    page_id, 
    title, 
    content,
    posted_by,
    datetime,
    image1,
    image2,
    field1,
    field2...,
    field100
}

page_like {
    page_id, 
    like
}
page_follow {
    page_id, 
    follow
}

page_comments {
    commentid, 
    page_id,
    text, 
    comment_like, 
    posted_by,
    datetime
}

Which one is best way? Or suggest some good Cassandra database design for this, using CQL

share|improve this question
    
How will you query the data? – rs_atl Feb 2 '13 at 20:19
    
Well, one query is obvious since he will have a web page presenting those following fields as he says. – Dean Hiller Feb 3 '13 at 1:12
    
my query should fetch page_id, title, content,posted_by,datetime,image1,image2,field1,field2..............,field100 ,like,follow,commentid, page_id,text, comment_like, posted_by,datetime of that particular page – user1802597 Feb 3 '13 at 12:06

You may want to read up on some noSQL patterns

https://github.com/deanhiller/playorm/wiki/Patterns-Page

If you are going to get all the comments from a page, I don't see any FK's to the comments, which you will need in the page_table which brings to lite, that page is missing a pattern. I will add which is a toMany in nosql is frequenly embedded in the row, rather than having an index. So you have this in alot of designs.

page_table {  
    page_id, 
    title, 
    content, 
    like, 
    follow,
    posted_by,
    datetime,
    image1,
    image2, 
    fktocomment1, 
    fktocomment2, 
    fktocomment3 
}

What is typically done is the fktocomment1 is prefexied with the word "comment" so you can find all the fks by stripping off the comment part and using the fk at the end(There is NO value!). It is a composite name pattern which you can google.

EDIT: patterns page edited/added that pattern it was so common, I never thought to add it before.

share|improve this answer
    
I am using cassandra and As far as i know, cassandra doesn't have concept of Foreign Key. But thanks for your answer. – user1802597 Feb 3 '13 at 12:08
1  
cassandra does NOT support Foreign Key "constraints" but people still use foreign keys in nosql all the time. On Most models, you hardly ever can denormalize it all into one table so you end up with foreign keys. – Dean Hiller Feb 3 '13 at 17:09
    
even your model above had foreign keys ;). in your comment_id table you have a foreign key page_id to refer back to the page row for that comment. – Dean Hiller Feb 3 '13 at 17:09
    
yah that is true that 'page_id' is what it is in 'page_table' but it not like FK as it happens in RDBMS am i right? means cassandra doesnt check this constraint its up to you how you manage, am i going right? – user1802597 Feb 3 '13 at 18:16
1  
yes, there is not constraint checking in noSQL solutions and it is up to you to manage(and sometimes you manage data corruption around that stuff but it is not a big deal typically, just typical operations and management...losing the constraint checking has not been a big issue) – Dean Hiller Feb 4 '13 at 1:42

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