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I tested the following code:

(function(){
  var x = false;  
  function x(){
    return true;
  }  
  return typeof x;
})();

It returns "boolean". And only when I comment the second line:

(function(){
  //var x = false;  
  function x(){
    return true;
  }  
  return typeof x;
})();

It returns "function". It means that if someone has declared a variable somewhere in the code before, my function declaration using the same name will fail, right? Please, someone explain it to me. Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In JavaScript, function declarations are treated as if they were written first. Then variable declarations. (That particular ordering matters very rarely, if ever.)

In variable declarations, any assignment part is treated as a separate expression statement occurring at the point in the function where the var statement actually appears. Thus:

function foo() {
  // ... some code ...
  if (whatever) {
    var x = whatever + 1;
  }
}

is treated like:

function foo() {
  var x;
  // ... some code ...
  if (whatever) {
    x = whatever + 1;
  }
}

Thus overall your first sample is treated as if it were:

(function() {
  function x() {
    return true;
  }
  var x;
  x = false;
  return typeof x;
})();

Note also that functions and variables share a common namespace. A var declaration without an assignment part for a variable name that's already been declared has no effect. (At least, I think it has no meaningful effect, but JavaScript has weird dark corners ...)

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Didn't know that, thanks! –  paperstreet7 Feb 2 '13 at 18:33
    
I would expect the function declarations to translate into function expression assignments written first? I.e. the code were treated as var x; x = function x(){…}; x = false; … –  Bergi Feb 2 '13 at 18:55
    
@Bergi well the JavaScript engine is free to do that I guess, but those two aren't exactly the same. The name provided in the function instantiation between function and the open parenthesis of the formal parameters is bound for the code in the function independent of symbols in the enclosing scope. It's (kind-of) like letrec in Lisp. (I don't know whether it's possible to construct an example that shows the difference, however.) –  Pointy Feb 2 '13 at 19:00
    
@Pointy: I have used a NFE for exactly that reason? Or do you mean something more specialized? –  Bergi Feb 2 '13 at 19:05
    
@Pointy, do you know Lisp? I have been wondering for a long time if I should learn Lisp before JavaScript to better understand functional programming. What do you think? I have already tried some Lisp and Scheme though, it seems rather different from C-like languages but interesting. –  paperstreet7 Feb 2 '13 at 19:24

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