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I'm trying to catch all unhandled exceptions in my app in order to conditionally handle those that can be without terminating the app, but I cannot solve a very basic problem: it doesn't stop the exception. An unhandled exception is thrown somewhere in the code, it comes here, the message box is shown, and then the application either shows that the same exceptions was unhandled (if in debug mode) or just crashes (if run without debugging). Meaning that the exception stays unhandled even though the handler was called.

App() {
    AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += (s, a) => {
        var ex = (Exception)a.ExceptionObject;
        MessageBox.Show(ex.Message, "Error", MessageBoxButton.OK, MessageBoxImage.Error);
    };
}

This is from a new, blank test project that has nothing in it but this code and a button that throws exception when clicked.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

From MSDN:

This event provides notification of uncaught exceptions. It allows the application to log information about the exception before the system default handler reports the exception to the user and terminates the application. If sufficient information about the state of the application is available, other actions may be undertaken — such as saving program data for later recovery. Caution is advised, because program data can become corrupted when exceptions are not handled.

In other words, it's just a handler to allow you to tell the user what happened, produce last minute save information if you need to be able to recover data, or do something like fire off a custom error report. It is not a catch block. To catch exceptions you have to use Try-Catch.

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Thanks, though that just means I'm back to square one — how to set up a global (multi-thread supporting) exception handler. –  Modus Operandi Feb 2 '13 at 19:39
    
I don't know that much about multithreading, but I suspect you would have to just Try-Catch the root method of each thread. That would give you more control over how you handle exceptions on a thread-by-thread basis anyway, since presumably each thread is doing something different which woudl require different handling. –  chirokidz Feb 2 '13 at 19:52

You are forgetting to terminate your program. So it continues on with the normal unhandled exception handling. Add this line:

  Environment.Exit(System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.GetHRForException(ex));

The slightly laborious Marshal call ensures that another process that obtains the Process.ExitCode for your process gets a reasonable error indication. It is optional, merely recommended.

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If this is really the behaviour that you want you could add the following to your application configuration file:

<legacyUnhandledExceptionPolicy enabled="1"/>

See Exceptions in Managed Threads.

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If I understand the MSDN document correctly, this will also make any unhandled exceptions in background threads to be handled silently. That does not work for me, I need a way to catch (and conditionally handle) all unhandled exceptions, regardless of where they're thrown. –  Modus Operandi Feb 2 '13 at 19:45
    
@ModusOperandi I don't understand. Have you tried? My understanding was the exceptions would still be caught by UnhandledException but they just wouldn't terminate the process. You could evaluate your exception and if necessary terminate. –  Daniel Kelley Feb 2 '13 at 19:48

It is not supposed to "stop" the exception, that behavior is by design:

This event provides notification of uncaught exceptions. It allows the application to log information about the exception before the system default handler reports the exception to the user and terminates the application.

Consider this the place were nobody else has bothered to handle the exception in question, there is nothing sensible left to do but log and die.

You should deal with those exceptions that should terminate the application closer to where they occur.

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You aren't actually catching the unhandled exceptions but merely handling an event that occurs right before terminating the application (in release mode). Subscribing to this event doesn't count as catching an already unhandled exception.

From MSDN: This event provides notification of uncaught exceptions. It allows the application to log information about the exception before the system default handler reports the exception to the user and terminates the application. If sufficient information about the state of the application is available, other actions may be undertaken — such as saving program data for later recovery. Caution is advised, because program data can become corrupted when exceptions are not handled.

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