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I have a python script (excerpt shown below) that reads a sensor value. Unfortunately, it runs only for 5 - 60 minutes at a time and then suddenly stops. Is there a way I can efficiently make this run forever? Is there any reason why a python script like this couldn't run forever on a Raspberry Pi, or does python automatically limit the duration of a script?

 while True:
    current_reading = readadc(current_sensor, SPICLK, SPIMOSI, SPIMISO, SPICS)
    current_sensed = (1000.0 * (0.0252 * (current_reading - 492.0))) - correction_factor

    values.append(current_sensed)
    if len(values) > 40:
           values.pop(0)

    if reading_number > 500:
           reading_number = 0

    reading_number = reading_number + 1

    if ( reading_number == 500 ):
           actual_current = round((sum(values)/len(values)), 1)

           # open up a cosm feed
           pac = eeml.datastream.Cosm(API_URL, API_KEY)

           #send data
           pac.update([eeml.Data(0, actual_current)])

           # send data to cosm
           pac.put()
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2  
Why does it stop? Do you receive any error messages? Have you tried debugging it? –  willOEM Feb 2 '13 at 20:18
    
For running forever is use a infinite loop that is stop if some break conditioning with some if that check some condition, like a certain value of a parameter read from a transducer. –  user1929959 Feb 2 '13 at 20:22
    
You probably have some exception there, that you might want to catch. Have you profiled memory usage of your program? –  moooeeeep Feb 2 '13 at 20:31
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2 Answers

It appears as though your loop lacks a delay and is constantly appending your "values" array, which will likely cause you to run out of memory in a fairly short period of time. I recommend adding a delay to avoid appending the values array every instant.

Adding a delay:

import time
while True:
    current_reading = readadc(current_sensor, SPICLK, SPIMOSI, SPIMISO, SPICS)
    current_sensed = (1000.0 * (0.0252 * (current_reading - 492.0))) - correction_factor

    values.append(current_sensed)
    if len(values) > 40:
           values.pop(0)

    if reading_number > 500:
           reading_number = 0

    reading_number = reading_number + 1

    if ( reading_number == 500 ):
           actual_current = round((sum(values)/len(values)), 1)

           # open up a cosm feed
           pac = eeml.datastream.Cosm(API_URL, API_KEY)

           #send data
           pac.update([eeml.Data(0, actual_current)])

           # send data to cosm
           pac.put()
    time.sleep(1)
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This is a good idea. The crash may be happening when I run out of memory. I'm going to eliminate the array and try it. –  Lucas Scott Feb 2 '13 at 21:47
    
No, it didn't work. Taking one reading every 30 seconds worked, with no array, but it still stopped after an hour and a half or so. –  Lucas Scott Feb 3 '13 at 0:00
    
If possible, it would be good to execute the same script on a PC or laptop to help determine whether or not the issue is caused by the environment. If the script also fails when running for a while on a PC, then one of the function calls might be silencing an exception and exiting, which would not be helpful. –  Cryo Feb 3 '13 at 2:45
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This should, in theory, run forever and Python does not limit script execution automagically. I'd guess you're hitting a problem with the readadc or the pac feed hanging and locking the script up or an exception in the execution (but you should see that if executing the script from command line). Does the script hang or does it stop and exit?

If you can output some data using print() and see it on the Pi, you can just add some simple debugging lines to see where it is hanging - you may or may not be able to fix it easily with a timeout argument. An alternative would also be to thread the script and run the loop body as a thread with the main thread acting as a watchdog and killing the processing threads if they take too long to do their thing.

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