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I don't really get making a class and using __slots__ can someone make it clearer?

For example, I'm trying to make two classes, one is empty the other isn't. I got this so far:

class Empty:
    __slots__ =()

def mkEmpty():
    return Empty()

class NonEmpty():
    __slots__ = ('one', 'two')

But I don't know how I would make "mkNonEmpty". I'm also unsure about my mkEmpty function.

Thanks

Edit:

This is what I ended up with:

class Empty:
    __slots__ =()

def mkEmpty():
    return Empty()

class NonEmpty():
    __slots__ = ('one', 'two')

def mkNonEmpty(one,two):
    p = NonEmpty()
    p.one= one
    p.two= two
    return p
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You then have to initialize your class in a traditional way. It will work like this :

class Empty:
    __slots__ =()

def mkEmpty():
    return Empty()

class NonEmpty():
    __slots__ = ('one', 'two')

    def __init__(self, one, two):
        self.one = one
        self.two = two

def mkNonEmpty(one, two):
    return NonEmpty(one, two)

Actually, the constructor functions are non-necessary and non pythonic. You can, and should use the class constructor directly, like so :

ne = NonEmpty(1, 2)

You can also use an empty constructor and set the slots directly in your application, if what you need is some kind of record

class NonEmpty():
    __slots__ = ('one', 'two')

n = NonEmpty()
n.one = 12
n.two = 15

You need to understand that slots are only necessary for performance/memory reasons. You don't need to use them, and probably shouldn't use them, except if you know that you are memory constrained. This only should be after actually stumbling into a problem though.

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Thanks, that was very helpful. Would you mind taking a look at my edit and telling me if its alright or not? –  Ecco Feb 2 '13 at 21:02
    
Well it works. Do you have any particular reason to be using a function to initialize your object rather than the class constructor like in my example though ? –  raph.amiard Feb 2 '13 at 21:04
    
Yeah, we have to do it the "dumb" way sigh it's for a lab. –  Ecco Feb 2 '13 at 21:06

Maybe the docs will help? Honestly, it doesn't sound like you're at a level where you need to be worrying about __slots__.

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