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Once you add an object to a vector in C++, and delete the pointer to that object, will the object inside the vector get deleted too?

for example,

int i = 0;
std::vector<A> aVect;
while(i++ < 10)
{    
    A *ptrToA = new A();
    aVect.push_back(*ptrToA);
    delete ptrToA;
}

would it still be valid to call:

aVect.at(2);

Will the call to "delete" destroy the object that was added to the vector, or will it only deallocate the object of the pointer?

share|improve this question
    
It will not destroy content in aVect, but it may destroy content in some A within aVect if A uses internal dynamic allocation and doesn't properly self-manage its resources. Specifically, virtual destruction, copy-construction and copy-assigning. See The Rule of Three for more info. – WhozCraig Feb 2 '13 at 20:31
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes you can delete the pointer because, as others have noted you dereference the pointer to it is copied into the vector by value.

It would be more efficient to just construct into the vector like this and avoid new/delete entirely:

int i = 0;
while(i++ < 10)
{    
    std::vector<A> aVect;
    aVect.push_back(A());
}

In C++11 a copy will not be made - the rvalue version of push_back will be used - A will be constructed into it's slot in the vector.

You may not want to create a new vector each time???

std::vector<A> aVect;
int i = 0;
while(i++ < 10)
{    
    aVect.push_back(A());
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Why use a loop? std::vector<A> aVect(10, A()); – chris Feb 2 '13 at 20:37
    
@chris Good point. I guess I hadn't thought anyone would do that for real. I'd expect different A's with different ctor args to be inserted in real code. I guess one could produce a vector of default constructed A and operate on them with an algo later though. – emsr Feb 2 '13 at 20:45
    
Thank you all for the answers. The while loop is useful i you want to add objects with different parameters each time I guess. aVect.push_back(A(i)); or something like that. But this does save time from having to worry about memory management. – mma1480 Feb 2 '13 at 20:46
    
You should be able to write huge systems without ever using new and delete. Let objects acquire whatever resources they need when they are constructed on the stack and let them release those resources when they go out of scope. The key word in RAII. – emsr Feb 2 '13 at 21:07

It will still be valid to call aVect.at(2), since the vector is holding a copy of *ptrToA. When you called aVect.push_back(*ptrToA), it set its A using the assignment operator.

share|improve this answer

Here you push a copy of the object to the vector and this copy will not get deleted.

However if you write:

int i = 0;
while(i++ < 10)
{    
    A *ptrToA = new A();
    std::vector<*A> aVect;
    aVect.push_back(ptrToA);
    delete ptrToA;
}

Then you are pushing pointers in the vector and when you delete ptrToA you also delete the element pointed to by the pointer in the vector.

share|improve this answer

You have created vector of objects of type A: std::vector<A>, which means that when you insert some new object into it, copy of this new object is created and stored into vector.

So yes, it it perfectly safe and valid to access this element even after the new object has been deleted. Deleting the original object won't affect the copy stored in your vector in any way.

Advantage of this kind of vector (vector that holds objects with automatic storage duration) is that memory where these objects are stored is cleaned up automatically once the vector is destructed. So it is less likely that there will be some memory leak in your code as well as less work for you since you don't need to take care of that ugly memory management on your own :)

share|improve this answer

No it won't. Your std::vector<A> stores instances of objects not pointers. In fact you are dereferencing the pointer while pushing A into the vector.

This will cause a copy of the object (built through copy constructor) to be stored inside your vector. After pushing the object you have 2 instances of an A class. One instance is allocated in the heap (through the new operator). The other instance is on the stack, where aVect is allocated.

On the other hand, if your vector would store pointers (std::vector<*A>), after deleting ptrToA, the pointer stored inside the vector points to an already released memory location (dangling pointer). Trying to access that pointer would cause an error, probably a segfault.

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