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I need to write a recursive method Power(base, exponent) that, when called, returns Power(3,4) = 3*3*3*3. And exponent is an integer greater than or equal to 1. Below is my code, but it is wrong. I want to use factorial, but i know little about factorial.

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Console.WriteLine("please enter base,\n" + "please enter exponent,\n" + "pressing 'Enter'after each one");

    double number1 = Convert.ToDouble(Console.ReadLine());

    int number2 = Convert.ToInt16(Console.ReadLine());

    double result = Pow(number1, number2);

    Console.WriteLine("pow({0},{1}) is {2}",number1,number2,result);
}

public static long Factorial(long number)
{
    if (number <= 1)
        return 1;
    else
        return number * Factorial(number - 1);
}

public static double Pow(double basevalue, int exponentvalue)
{
    double a=1;
    if (exponentvalue==1)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("It is not make sense!");
        return basevalue;
    }
    else if(exponentvalue > 1)
    {
        a=exponentvalue * Factorial(exponentvalue - 1);
    }
    return a;
}
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closed as not a real question by MrSmith42, drwelden, Bakudan, hjpotter92, SztupY Feb 3 '13 at 3:17

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
Ever tried Google? I've heard it being mentioned a couple of times, and I think it might be exactly what you need. –  antonijn Feb 2 '13 at 20:39
1  
Do you know what a factorial is? –  antonijn Feb 2 '13 at 20:42
3  
Why are you talking about factorial to calculated powers? That makes no sense. –  Matt Burland Feb 2 '13 at 20:43
    
And by the way: Welcome to Stack Overflow. If you haven't done it already, I suggest that you read the FAQ. –  Martin Liversage Feb 2 '13 at 20:57

3 Answers 3

I assume that the reason you talk about factorial is because it can be computed using a recursive algorithm and so can computing the integer power of a number. Other than that you should not use factorial to compute the power.

To compute the power of a number using recursion you can do it like this:

Power(base, exponent) = base*Power(base, exponent - 1)

and to terminate the recursion:

Power(base, 0) = 1

Computing Power(3, 4) using recursion evaluates to this:

Power(3, 4)
    = 3*Power(3, 3)
    = 3*3*Power(3, 2)
    = 3*3*3*Power(3, 1)
    = 3*3*3*3*Power(3, 0)
    = 3*3*3*3*1

Implementing this in C# is left as an exercise.

share|improve this answer
    
Heh heh, guess I kinda spoiled the exercise... –  antonijn Feb 2 '13 at 20:53
    
thank you for your help –  Luke Feb 2 '13 at 23:05

Firstly, you need to look up some of the functions you are using mate. Factorials have got nothing to do with powers. You can write a power as a recursive function as such:

internal static double Pow(double @base, int exponent)
{
    if (exponent < 0)
    {
        Console.Error.WriteLine("Usage of this function is limited to positive exponents only");
        throw new Exception();
    }
    else if (exponent == 1)
    {
        return @base;
    }
    else if (exponent == 0)
    {
        return 1;
    }
    else
    {
        return @base * Pow(@base, exponent - 1);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
@RaphaëlAlthaus Speak for yourself. –  antonijn Feb 2 '13 at 21:49
    
Well clarity part is a question of personal point of view (no need to be rude). The "redundancy" part is not an opinion, it's a fact. –  Raphaël Althaus Feb 2 '13 at 21:53
    
@RaphaëlAlthaus I actually added it to be more explicit, as in: "if none of the above conditions are true, only then, return x", as opposed to leaving the else out (it'll compile to the same CIL anyway). Secondly, "don't use else with return statements" is just as imperative as "speak for yourself", so I don't quite understand how I'm suddenly rude. –  antonijn Feb 2 '13 at 22:01
    
For the last point, you're right, sorry ;) I'm still not ok with the "clarity", but... that's kind of personal. –  Raphaël Althaus Feb 2 '13 at 22:03
    
@RaphaëlAlthaus Well let's agree to disagree on that one then (or edit the answer if you really want to make a point ;) ). –  antonijn Feb 2 '13 at 22:07

Easy. You can throw in some extra checks for invalid exponentvalue if you want.

public static double Pow(double basevalue, int exponentvalue)
{
    if (exponentvalue == 0)
    {
        return 1;
    }
    if (exponentvalue == 1)
    {
        return baseValue;
    }
    return baseValue * Pow(basevalue, exponentvalue-1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your help –  Luke Feb 2 '13 at 23:05

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