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I am a collaborator on a Heroku java project. I want to clone the project.

When I execute

git:clone -a theapp

I get console messages which I have seen in other posts:

Cloning from app 'theapp'...
Cloning into 'theapp'...
Warning: Permanently added the RSA host key for IP address '50.19.xx.xxx' to the list of known hosts.
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@         WARNING: UNPROTECTED PRIVATE KEY FILE!          @
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
Permissions 0644 for '/Users/me/.ssh/id_rsa' are too open.
It is recommended that your private key files are NOT accessible by others.
This private key will be ignored.
bad permissions: ignore key: /Users/me/.ssh/id_rsa
Permission denied (publickey).
fatal: The remote end hung up unexpectedly

I understand that I might be able to change the permissions of /Users/me/.ssh/id_rsa to 700 to fix this problem, but I feel this issue is specifically related to collaborating, where I am not the owner of the project. I have tried :

 Heroku keys:add 

as well, which did not resolve the problem.

Has anyone successfully git:cloned a project of which he/she was a collaborator - not an owner?

Any help is much appreciated.

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1 Answer 1

This issue is not specific to Github or being a collaborator. A private key must be private. Your private key has permissions that allow those other than the owner - you - to view your private key. This makes the key no longer private.

If you run the following:

ls -All /Users/me/.ssh/id_rsa

You will see that the key has r or rw rights to users other than the owner.

What you need to do is change those permissions so that only the owner has permissions to the key, making it private again. You can do so by running chmod 700 on the file:

chmod 700 /Users/me/.ssh/id_rsa

Now you have a protected private key that only you, the owner, can read, run and execute.

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Thanks for your help. I wanted to avoid using the chmod command. Yesterday, from within Eclipse, I used the Heroku plug-in to import an existing Heroku project, and I successfully imported the project into my Eclipse workspace. The Eclipse plug-in seems to do the git:clone for you. It did not change the permissions of id_rsa (still -rw-r--r--). I don't think that the plug-in is generating rsa keys in a file other than /Users/me/.ssh/id_rsa. So, how does the Eclipse accomplish the git:clone without encountering the Permissions too open issue? –  billybyte Feb 3 '13 at 14:47
    
Perhaps Eclipse is doing the git clone over HTTPS via your stored username and password. This would eliminate the need for an ssh key, but is less secure. I'm not sure why you want to avoid using chmod and making your key private, but if you are not going to do it then you should delete the key completely and use HTTPS. –  Dan Hoerst Feb 3 '13 at 16:43
    
I didn't want to do anything that alters the behavior of Eclipse/Heroku - which is working fine (currently). I guess I could do the chmod, and if it causes the Eclipse/Heroku plug-in to stop working, I could change the permissions back. –  billybyte Feb 3 '13 at 17:27
    
I'm not very familiar with Eclipse, but I can almost guarantee that setting up your private keys correctly will not cause it to stop working. –  Dan Hoerst Feb 3 '13 at 18:24
    
Ok - I'll give that a try. Thanks very much for your help. –  billybyte Feb 3 '13 at 23:14

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