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AS REQUESTED, ACTUAL FILES:

d_date.h http://pastebin.com/AFe4XE2c

d_except.h http://pastebin.com/8QE2m8ia

d_date.cpp http://pastebin.com/dgpxLWKv

input.dat http://pastebin.com/XUpRcu9E

I did a bare bones program similar to the following one, and I got similar errors.

CLASS:

#ifndef DATE_CLASS
#define DATE_CLASS

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <string>

//#include "d_except.h"

using namespace std;

class date
{
   public:
      date ();

      //ADDED
      friend ostream& operator<<(ostream&, const date&); 
      friend istream& operator>>(istream&, date&);

   private:
      int month, day, year;
            // private members that specify the date

};


#endif 

AND DATE.CPP:

#ifndef DATE_CPP
#define DATE_CPP

#include "date.h"
#include <stdexcept>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

ostream& operator<<(ostream& ostr, const date& date1){
     char blah;
     ostr << blah;
 }

 istream& operator>>(istream& istr, date& date1){
     istr >> "5";
     return istr;
 }


#endif

DRIVER.CPP:

#include <iostream>
#include "date.h"
//#include "d_except.h"

using namespace std;

void main (void)
{
    date date1;
    date date2;
}

AND THE ERRORS (not posting the length list but the ones towards the end:

c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\istream(373): or       'std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits> &std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits>::operator >>(unsigned __int64 &)'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              _Elem=char,
1>              _Traits=std::char_traits<char>
1>          ]
1>          c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\istream(392): or       'std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits> &std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits>::operator >>(float &)'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              _Elem=char,
1>              _Traits=std::char_traits<char>
1>          ]
1>          c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\istream(411): or       'std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits> &std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits>::operator >>(double &)'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              _Elem=char,
1>              _Traits=std::char_traits<char>
1>          ]
1>          c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\istream(429): or       'std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits> &std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits>::operator >>(long double &)'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              _Elem=char,
1>              _Traits=std::char_traits<char>
1>          ]
1>          c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\istream(447): or       'std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits> &std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits>::operator >>(void *&)'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              _Elem=char,
1>              _Traits=std::char_traits<char>
1>          ]
1>          c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\istream(466): or       'std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits> &std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits>::operator >>(std::basic_streambuf<_Elem,_Traits> *)'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              _Elem=char,
1>              _Traits=std::char_traits<char>
1>          ]
1>          while trying to match the argument list '(std::istream, const char [2])'
1>  Generating Code...
1>
1>Build FAILED.

THE LENGTHIER VERSION: (IGNORE THE FOLLOWING) I get hideous warnings when I use the following:

class date
{
   public:
    //irrelevant (hopefully) functions not shown are here
    friend ostream& operator<<(ostream&, const date&); 
    friend istream& operator>>(istream&, date&);

   private:
    int month, day, year;
}

 ostream& operator<<(ostream& ostr, const date& date1){
    ostr << date1.getDay() << "/" << date1.getMonth() << "/" << date1.getYear() << " "; 
    return ostr;
 }

 istream& operator>>(istream& istr, date& date1){
     int d, m, y;
     char ch;
     istr >> d >> ch >> m >> ch >> y >> ch;
     date1.setDay(d);
     date1.setMonth(m);
     date1.setYear(y);
     return istr;
 }

My input is input.dat and specified in the DeBugging page in Microsoft Visual Studio 2010. I get repetitions of the following with different variables after the >>. As best I can tell, there is some problem with istream using date. I think it kind of "tells" me in the last line of this post what the problem is, but I still don't get it.

c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\istream(411): or       'std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits> &std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits>::operator >>(double &)'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              _Elem=char,
1>              _Traits=std::char_traits<char>
1>          ]
1>          c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\istream(429): or       'std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits> &std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits>::operator >>(long double &)'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              _Elem=char,
1>              _Traits=std::char_traits<char>
1>          ]
1>          c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\istream(447): or       'std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits> &std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits>::operator >>(void *&)'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              _Elem=char,
1>              _Traits=std::char_traits<char>
1>          ]
1>          c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\istream(466): or       'std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits> &std::basic_istream<_Elem,_Traits>::operator >>(std::basic_streambuf<_Elem,_Traits> *)'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              _Elem=char,
1>              _Traits=std::char_traits<char>
1>          ]
1>          while trying to match the argument list '(std::istream, date)'

The actual .cpp that runs this stuff is:

void main (void)
{
    date date1;
    date date2;

    cout << "Enter date1 and date2:" << endl;

    while (cin >> date1 >> date2)
    {
        cout << "Printing date1 and date2" << endl;
        cout << date1 << endl << date2 << endl;
                //and more...

}

ADDENDUM:

class date
{
   public:
      date (int mm=1, int dd=1, int yyyy=1900);
            // supply date in format MM/DD/YYYY
            // preconditions: 1 <= mm <= 12,
            //                1 <= dd <= daysInMonth()

      void writeShortDate () const;
            // output the date in the format "MM/DD/YYYY"
      void writeLongDate () const;
            // output the date in the format "month day, year"

      void incrementDate(int ndays);
            // add ndays days to the date
            // precondition: 0 <= ndays <= 365

      int numberOfDays() const;
            // return the number of days into the year

      int getMonth() const;// done
            // return the month as integer value 1 to 12
      int getDay() const; //done
            // return day of the month
      int getYear() const;  //done
            // return the year

      void setMonth(int mm); //done
            // update the month
            // precondition: 1 <= mm <= 12
      void setDay(int dd); //done
            // update the day
            // precondition: 1 <= dd <= daysInMonth()
      void setYear(int yyyy); //done
            // update the year
            // precondition:  if the date is February 29,
            //                yyyy must be a leap year
      int daysInMonth() const;
            // return number of days in the month

      bool isLeapYear() const;
            // is the current year a leap year (true/false)

      //ADDED
      bool operator< (const date&) const;
      bool operator> (const date&) const;
      date operator++ ();
      friend ostream& operator<<(ostream&, const date&); 
      friend istream& operator>>(istream&, date&);
   private:
      enum monthName {Jan = 1, Feb, Mar, Apr, May, Jun,
                      Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov, Dec};
            // private type used by date

      int month, day, year;
            // private members that specify the date

};

AND:

#ifndef DRIVER_H
#define DRIVER_H

#include <iostream>
#include "d_date.h"
#include "d_except.h"

using namespace std;

void main (void)
{
    date date1;
    date date2;

    cout << "Enter date1 and date2:" << endl;

    while (cin >> date1 >> date2)
    {
        cout << "Printing date1 and date2" << endl;
        cout << date1 << endl << date2 << endl;

        if (date1 == date2) 
            cout << date1 << " is equal to " << date2 << endl;

        if (date1 != date2) 
            cout << date1 << " is not equal to " << date2 << endl;

        if (date1 < date2) 
            cout << date1 << " is less than " << date2 << endl;

        if (date1 > date2) 
            cout << date1 << " is greater than " << date2 << endl;

        ++date1;
        ++date2;

        cout << "Increment of date1: " << date1 << endl;
        cout << "Increment of date2: " << date2 << endl;

        cout << endl << "---End of Run---" << endl << endl;

        cout << "Enter date1 and date2:" << endl;
    }


}

This is for school, and I hate to post nearly the entire assignment, but I can't fix the errors. Above is the more detailed version of date.h and driver.cpp.

I don't know what I did, but now the only error I get is:

Error   1   error C2678: binary '>>' : no operator found which takes a left-hand operand of type 'std::istream' (or there is no acceptable conversion)

Also, forgot to mention...overloading code for driver.cpp is not shown here but causes no errors.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Beerlington, Shai, Henry, alxx, iDev Feb 4 '13 at 7:09

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Semicolon after class-definition? –  antonijn Feb 2 '13 at 21:55
2  
It looks like some (the beginning) of the error is missing. Also, don't use void main. –  chris Feb 2 '13 at 21:55
    
I can't see function getDay() etc. been declared nor defined. Could you show us your real code? –  Andy Prowl Feb 2 '13 at 21:56
    
Unrelated but void main(void) isn't a proper main function signature in C++. Use int main() or int main(int argc, char** argv). –  Rapptz Feb 2 '13 at 21:57
    
With minimal changes (semicolon after class, changing getters and setters to data members, adding a finishing brace in main), it works. A complete, minimal sample would help more. –  chris Feb 2 '13 at 21:59

1 Answer 1

The compiler is telling you that there is a problem with operator >> while trying to match the argument list '(std::istream, date)'. In fact, in your overload of operator >> for your date class you have this instruction in the last version of the code you posted:

istr >> "5";

Normally, the second parameter in the signature of an operator >> overload is a non-const reference to an object which is supposed to be extracted (deserialized) from a stream. However, the string literal "5" has type char [2], and no overload exist of operator >> for that type. That makes sense: how could you extract an object from a stream and store it into a string literal?

Hence, the error you get. I suspect your previous versions of the code were affected by similar problems.

share|improve this answer
    
I was wondering myself whether there was some date temporary used like that. –  chris Feb 2 '13 at 23:14
    
I don't mean to be rude or sound inconsiderate because you were right about the problems you mentioned, but my structure code suffered from that mistake, while the stuff I actually, ironically used did not (embarrassingly) , and the program still gives all the errors it had before. There is a little red squiggly under all the overloading symbols on the large program. I do not know how to get rid of them. driver.h cannot reach d_date.h??? –  user963070 Feb 2 '13 at 23:30
    
@user963070: once again, without seeing your real code, we cannot do anything to help you. Please post it somewhere. –  Andy Prowl Feb 2 '13 at 23:35
    
After fixing a bunch of obvious problems (void main, date has a constructor that isn't defined anywhere, operator << doesn't return anything, and switching what << and >> do) it compiles just fine with clang++-3.1. –  vonbrand Feb 3 '13 at 2:08
    
@AndyProwl: d_date.h pastebin.com/AFe4XE2c d_except.h pastebin.com/8QE2m8ia d_date.cpp pastebin.com/BfkSjsCL input.dat pastebin.com/XUpRcu9E –  user963070 Feb 3 '13 at 5:51

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