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This seems like bad coding practice, but it was the guidelines given to me. I want to preface by saying I have no idea how this will actually be implemented in the main, Im just writing the class.

class Example
{
  private:
     static int total;
  public:
    void initalizeTotal();
}

Example::initalizeTotal()
{
   total = 0;
}

total will (I guess) be used to count the number of objects of that class. This is basically what I'm getting at. The problem is how I figure out how to actually call the function. I can't just call it in the constructor, sense that would reset total each time. And I've tried and failed "check" if the variable has a value yet and if not, call the function.

Is there any advice anyone can give?

EDIT: I forgot to include that total is static. And that i MUST have a function that initializes total. Thats a requirement of the assignment.

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Hope this helps: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/b1b5y48f(v=vs.80).aspx –  chris Feb 2 '13 at 22:12

4 Answers 4

Since total should be the same variable for every object, you should make it static:

class Example {
    private:
        static int total;
}

To initialize a static variable, you can place this line in a .cpp file:

int Example::total = 0;

You do not need to call any function to do this initialization.

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I know this. This is normally how I initialize variables. This is however an assignment where I MUST use a function. Sucks I know -_- –  user2036101 Feb 2 '13 at 22:35
    
Must it be a member function? Are you allowed to declare the function as static? –  Code-Apprentice Feb 2 '13 at 23:32

You can make total variable static:

class Example
{
  private:
     void addObject();
  public:
     static int total;
     Example();
}

Example::Example()
{
   addObject();
}

void Example::addObject()
{
   total++;
}

So that it will not belong to any specific object. If you then increase it's value in addObject() method which will be called in a constructor, you will get objects count.

To access it, you will not be using any Example object, but instead you may use it like this:

std::cout << "Objects count:" << Example::total;

If you want to initialize it, you do it same way somewhere in your code:

Example::total = 0;
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1  
The name should change as well, it's not initializing anything. –  Ed S. Feb 2 '13 at 22:17
    
You're missing a return type on your definition of initalizeTotal() now. Since it doesn't touch the state of any instance it should be static also. You'd be better off making it private too otherwise everyone and anyone can mess with what seems to be internal state. –  Flexo Feb 2 '13 at 22:18
1  
Also, and I realize this is going beyond the scope of the question, this will break if these objects are ever created simultaneously by multiple threads. –  Ed S. Feb 2 '13 at 22:19
    
Right, fixed those in my edit already. Thanks. –  Piotr Chojnacki Feb 2 '13 at 22:30

You have to use 'total' field as static variable in order to share with all created objects of type Example. And any time instantating a new object increase the total field. Hope this help

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Try the following:

#include <iostream>

class Example {
   static int total;

   public:
     Example() { total++; }
     static int getTotal() { return total; }
};

int Example::total = 0;

int main() {
    Example a, b, c, d;

    std::cout << Example::getTotal(); // 4
}
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Why is getTotal() not static? –  Flexo Feb 2 '13 at 22:21
    
@Flexo Should it be? Why? –  0x499602D2 Feb 2 '13 at 22:24
1  
It should be because it accesses no non-static state and has no need of such access, for the same reason that non-mutating members should be const. You can still call a.getTotal() even if it's static though, just like calling a const member on a non-const instance. –  Flexo Feb 2 '13 at 22:26

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