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I'm trying to create a program that takes the difference of two military times and get its time difference.

Example:

**AM to PM**

Time 1: 0900

Time 2: 1730

Time Difference: 8 hours 30 minutes

**PM to AM**

Time 1: 1200

Time 2: 1100

Time Difference: 23 hours 0 minutes

Using a couple of if than else statements, I was able to figure out how to convert from military hours into standard hours but I'm stuck with how to go about subtracting time. I was trying to come up with a way to do with on paper just with addition and subtraction but I haven't developed a method that works in all cases. Any help?

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I don't think 24:00 is legal in military time. – David Feb 2 '13 at 22:15
1  
2400 isn't a valid military time (it would be 0000, or zero hundred hours), and your second time difference isn't correct (it should be 11 hours - midnight to 11AM = 11 hours). – Ken White Feb 2 '13 at 22:18
1  
It depends on the definitions in effect; 2400 is allowed if you have one date, such as 2013-02-01 08:00 to 24:00; otherwise, you have to use 2013-02-01 08:00 to 2013-02-02 00:00, which is a nuisance. ISO 8601:2004 explicitly recognizes this: §4.2.3 Midnight The complete representations in basic and extended format for midnight, in accordance with 4.2.2, shall be expressed in either of the two following ways: Basic format Extended format a) 000000 00:00:00 (the beginning of a calendar day) b) 240000 24:00:00 (the end of a calendar day) ... – Jonathan Leffler Feb 2 '13 at 22:32
    
^^ Sorry I meant to say from 12 PM to 11 AM (1200 to 0000) – Wormhole99 Feb 3 '13 at 1:28
up vote 2 down vote accepted

One option might be to split the time into two elements, the hours and the minutes.

First, take the time, ie. 1730 and divide by 100. If its an integer or similar, it should result in 17 hours (it will automatically round down).

Then take 1730 and mod it by 100 to get 30 minutes.

int time1 = 900;
int time2 = 1730;
int diffHours = time2 / 100 - time1 / 100;
int diffMinutes = time2 % 100 - time1 % 100;

If you're unfamiliar with modulus (%), it just returns the remainder after dividing the two numbers, so 7 % 3 would be 1.

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This would work for getting the difference between two times from AM to PM (ex. 17 - 9 = 8 hrs, 30 - 0 = 30 mins) but I'm also trying to get this to work from PM to AM. – Wormhole99 Feb 4 '13 at 1:01
    
In that case, you would take the absolute value of the above results (they would be negative) and subtract them from 24 hours. – pdel Feb 5 '13 at 2:31
    
Using your method when I subtracted 24 from 8 and 30 from 0, I got 16 hours and 30 minutes instead of 15 hours and 30 minutes. I've added the following to your above code: diffHours = 24 - abs(diffHours); and diffMinutes = abs(diffMinutes); – Wormhole99 Feb 5 '13 at 12:03

Assuming your military times are stored as int values in the range 0000..2400, then the following function will return the difference between two such values.

#include <cassert>

extern int timediff_minutes(int t1, int t2);

int timediff_minutes(int t1, int t2)
{
    assert(t1 >= 0 && t1 <= 2400);
    assert(t2 >= 0 && t2 <= 2400);
    assert(t1 % 100 < 60 && t2 % 100 < 60);
    int t1_mins = (t1 / 100) * 60 + (t1 % 100);
    int t2_mins = (t2 / 100) * 60 + (t2 % 100);
    return(t2_mins - t1_mins);
}

Note that 2400 is useful for representing the end of the day — and using 2400 is sanctioned by ISO 8601:2004 Data elements and interchange formats — Information interchange — Representation of dates and times.

4.2.3 Midnight

The complete representations in basic and extended format for midnight, in accordance with 4.2.2, shall be expressed in either of the two following ways:

    Basic format    Extended format
 a) 000000          00:00:00       (the beginning of a calendar day)
 b) 240000          24:00:00       (the end of a calendar day)

The representations may have reduced accuracy in accordance with 4.2.2.3 or may be designated as a time expression in accordance with 4.2.2.5. To represent midnight the representations may be expanded with a decimal fraction containing only zeros in accordance with 4.2.2.4.

NOTE 1 Midnight will normally be represented as [00:00] or [24:00].
NOTE 2 The end of one calendar day [24:00] coincides with [00:00] at the start of the next calendar day, e.g. [24:00] on 12 April 1985 is the same as [00:00] on 13 April 1985. If there is no association with a date or a time interval both a) and b) represent the same local time in the 24-hour timekeeping system.
NOTE 3 The choice of representation a) or b) will depend upon any association with a date, or a time interval. Representations where [hh] has the value [24] are only preferred to represent the end of a time interval in accordance with 4.4 or recurring time interval in accordance with 4.5.

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John, I made a mistake in my original post, the time should be 2300 instead of 2400. – Wormhole99 Feb 3 '13 at 0:31
    
OK - no problem. My comments still apply (2400 is convenient to distinguish midnight at the end of a day from midnight at the beginning of the day). If you want to restrict the value to < 2400, that's OK too; the code will work just as well. – Jonathan Leffler Feb 3 '13 at 0:38

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