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I'm having to write an "immediate" mode implementation of Linq (due to memory allocation restrictions on Unity/Mono - long story, not really important).

I'm fine with everything performing as fast as or faster than real Linq until I come to ThenBy. Clearly my method for applying this is flawed as my performance drops to 4x slower that the real deal.

So what I'm doing right now is -

For each OrderBy, ThenBy clause

  • Create a list of the for the results of each selector, add all of the results of the selector evaluation to the list
  • Create a lambda that uses the default comparer which uses the list indexed off the two parameters

It looks like this:

public static IEnumerable<T> OrderByDescending<T,TR>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T,TR> clause, IComparer<TR> comparer = null)
{
    comparer = comparer ?? Comparer<TR>.Default;
    var linqList = source as LinqList<T>;
    if(linqList == null)
    {
        linqList = Recycler.New<LinqList<T>>();
        linqList.AddRange(source);
    }
    if(linqList.sorter!=null)
        throw new Exception("Use ThenBy and ThenByDescending after an OrderBy or OrderByDescending");
    var keys = Recycler.New<List<TR>>();
    keys.Capacity = keys.Capacity > linqList.Count ? keys.Capacity : linqList.Count;
    foreach(var item in source)
    {
        keys.Add(clause(item));
    }
    linqList.sorter = (x,y)=>-comparer.Compare(keys[x],keys[y]);
    return linqList;


}

public static IEnumerable<T> ThenBy<T,TR>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T,TR> clause, IComparer<TR> comparer = null)
{
    comparer = comparer ?? Comparer<TR>.Default;
    var linqList = source as LinqList<T>;
    if(linqList == null || linqList.sorter==null)
    {
        throw new Exception("Use OrderBy or OrderByDescending first");
    }
    var keys = Recycler.New<List<TR>>();
    keys.Capacity = keys.Capacity > linqList.Count ? keys.Capacity : linqList.Count;
    foreach(var item in source)
    {
        keys.Add(clause(item));
    }
    linqList.sorters.Add((z,x,y)=>z != 0 ? z : comparer.Compare(keys[x],keys[y]));
    return linqList;


}

Then what I do in the sort function is create a lamda that applies the sorts in order - so I end up with a function that looks like a Comparer<int> and returns the correct ordering.

It starts this really poor performance. I've tried version using currying and different signatures for OrderBy and ThenBy functions, but nothing is really working any faster and I'm wondering if I'm just missing a trick about multikey sorting.

The sort variables and function:

    public List<Func<int,int,int,int>> sorters = new List<Func<int, int, int, int>>();
    public Func<int,int,int> sorter;
    public List<int> sortList = new List<int>();
    bool sorted;
    private List<T> myList = new List<T>();

    void ResolveSorters()
    {
        if(sorter==null)
            return;

        Func<int,int,int> function = null;

        if(sorters.Count==0)
        {
            function = sorter;
        }
        else
        {
            function = sorter;
            foreach(var s in sorters)
            {
                var inProgress = function;
                var current = s;
                function = (x,y)=>current(inProgress(x,y), x,y);
            }
        }
        sortList.Capacity = sortList.Capacity < myList.Count ? myList.Count : sortList.Capacity;
        sortList.Clear();
        sortList.AddRange(System.Linq.Enumerable.Range(0,myList.Count));
        //var c = myList.Count;
        /*for(var i =0; i < c; i++)
            sortList.Add(i);*/
        sortList.Sort(new Comparison<int>(function));
        sorted = true;
        sorters.Clear();
    }
share|improve this question
    
Where is most CPU time being spent? –  usr Feb 2 '13 at 22:21
    
It's hard to tell because the profiling tools are poor. About the best I can tell is that it is in the sort with the comparison (so basically that lambda). –  Mike Talbot Feb 2 '13 at 22:22
    
I originally thought that it was down to the fact that you end up with a double lambda when there are two keys (you can just use it directly when there is only one). But I "think" I tested that by currying in a third parameter, the result of the first compare, which reduced the call depth back to 2 - similar performance to the version without that code (8% faster, but nowhere near the "real" performance). –  Mike Talbot Feb 2 '13 at 22:24
    
Can you post more complete code? I have trouble piecing everything together in my head. Let's see the sort call and all code that runs during the sort. –  usr Feb 2 '13 at 22:25
1  
In actual LINQ, OrderBy() returns IOrderedEnumerable, you might want to take advantage of that. Also, have you checked the source of mono's implementation? –  svick Feb 2 '13 at 22:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'll need to guess but I'm still taking a shot at this. I think we should try getting rid of that nested lambda stuff and delegate conversions. I'm not sure how well that performs. The sort function should be this:

Func<int, int, int>[] sorters = ...; //fill this. it really should be an array!
Comparison<int> = (a, b) => {
 foreach (var s in sorters) {
  var cmp = s(a, b);
  if(cmp != 0) return cmp;
 }
 return 0;
};

So we got rid of the nested invocations. All a simple loop now. You can build specialized versions for small loop sizes:

Func<int, int, int>[] sorters = ...; //fill this. it really should be an array!
switch (sorters.Length) {
 case 2: {
   var s0 = sorters[0], s1 = sorters[1];
   Comparison<int> = (a, b) => {
     var cmp = s0(a, b);
     if(cmp != 0) return cmp;
     var cmp = s1(a, b);
     if(cmp != 0) return cmp;
     return 0;
   };
}

Unroll the loop so that no arrays appear anymore during the sort.

All of this is really working around the fact that we don't have static knowledge of the sort function's structure. It would be much faster if the comparison function was just handed in by the caller.

Update: Repro (100% more throughput than LINQ)

        Process.GetCurrentProcess().PriorityClass = ProcessPriorityClass.High;

        Func<int, int, int>[] sorters = new Func<int, int, int>[]
            {
                (a, b) => (a & 0x1).CompareTo(b & 0x1),
                (a, b) => (a & 0x2).CompareTo(b & 0x2),
                (a, b) => (a & 0x4).CompareTo(b & 0x4),
                (a, b) => a.CompareTo(b),
            };

        Func<int, int, int> comparisonB = sorters[0];
        for (int i = 1; i < sorters.Length; i++)
        {
            var func1 = comparisonB;
            var func2 = sorters[i];
            comparisonB = (a, b) =>
                {
                    var cmp = func1(a, b);
                    if (cmp != 0) return cmp;
                    return func2(a, b);
                };
        }
        var comparisonC = new Comparison<int>(comparisonB);

        Comparison<int> comparisonA = (a, b) =>
        {
            foreach (var s in sorters)
            {
                var cmp = s(a, b);
                if (cmp != 0) return cmp;
            }
            return 0;
        };

        Func<int, int, int> s0 = sorters[0], s1 = sorters[1], s2 = sorters[2], s3 = sorters[3];
        Comparison<int> comparisonD = (a, b) =>
            {
                var cmp = s0(a, b);
                if (cmp != 0) return cmp;
                cmp = s1(a, b);
                if (cmp != 0) return cmp;
                cmp = s2(a, b);
                if (cmp != 0) return cmp;
                cmp = s3(a, b);
                if (cmp != 0) return cmp;
                return 0;
            };

        {
            GC.Collect();
            var data = CreateSortData();
            var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            Array.Sort(data, comparisonC);
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine(sw.Elapsed.TotalSeconds);
        }

        {
            GC.Collect();
            var data = CreateSortData();
            var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            Array.Sort(data, comparisonA);
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine(sw.Elapsed.TotalSeconds);
        }

        {
            GC.Collect();
            var data = CreateSortData();
            var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            Array.Sort(data, comparisonD);
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine(sw.Elapsed.TotalSeconds);
        }

        {
            GC.Collect();
            var data = CreateSortData();
            var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            foreach (var source in data.OrderBy(x => x & 0x1).ThenBy(x => x & 0x2).ThenBy(x => x & 0x4).ThenBy(x => x))
            {

            }
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine(sw.Elapsed.TotalSeconds);
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, so the "foreach" version totally kills it - it must be creating that enumerable for each entry. I'm also sorry to say that the performance of the special case version is within 2% of the performance that I was getting. –  Mike Talbot Feb 2 '13 at 22:50
    
Is "kills it" good or bad? :) –  usr Feb 2 '13 at 22:51
    
I'm wondering about whether your point about lists is important (especially for the keys) - the problem is that I can't use arrays because I can't reuse them for that part (would require that the dimensions matched which isn't a limitation with the List). –  Mike Talbot Feb 2 '13 at 22:51
    
Sorry - bad, 2x slower I'm afraid –  Mike Talbot Feb 2 '13 at 22:52
    
Even if slower I cannot believe by 2x. So I wrote a repro and it is 50% faster. Code added to the post. Either your measurement is fishy or you're running in debug mode or debugger attached (yes, even the debugger attached prevents optimizations). –  usr Feb 2 '13 at 23:02

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